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Colin Kirkpatrick

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Colin Kirkpatrick

This chapter examines the diffusion and transfer of impact assessment (IA) in developing countries. ‘Diffusion’ is used to refer to the spread of IA from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries to developing countries. This spread of IA to developing and transition countries is first described. This is followed by a discussion of the ‘transfer’ of IA to lower- and middle-income economies. Here, transfer is used to refer to the successful adoption and implementation of IA. This allows for a discussion the problems of inappropriate policy transfer in the context of diffusion of the ‘best practice’ OECD IA model. The key factors that will affect the successful transfer and sustainability of the IA approach to developing countries is then discussed. The chapter ends with a brief summary and conclusion.

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Colin Kirkpatrick

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Edited by Colin Kirkpatrick and David Parker

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Colin Kirkpatrick and David Parker

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David Parker and Colin Kirkpatrick

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Regulatory Impact Assessment

Towards Better Regulation?

Edited by Colin Kirkpatrick and David Parker

Better state regulation is a key component of economic reform. This is the first book to comprehensively explore international experience in the use of Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA), which involves assessing the potential benefits and costs of any regulatory change. The contributors reveal that RIA is being adopted by an increasing number of countries as a route to better regulation with varying degrees of success. The book includes contributions from leading experts on regulatory reform and introduces a range of case studies from developed, developing and transitional economies.
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David Parker and Colin Kirkpatrick