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Edited by David Billis and Colin Rochester

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Edited by David Billis and Colin Rochester

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David Billis and Colin Rochester

The title of this section of our Introduction is intended to reflect our contention that we are writing in a fascinating period for organisational studies during which the rise of hybrid organisations (HOs) is causing us to reconsider the way we understand the world of organisations. The ‘new kids on the block’ are turning out to be not so young, nor so few in numbers, nor so inconsequential as is sometimes assumed. The growing excitement and fascination of these times is sometimes tempered by a sense of discomfort and uncertainty. Are HOs making a positive contribution to our society? Or are their problems causing too many difficulties? Should we keep well away from them? Before responding to these questions, we first provide the background for and scope of the book, and in so doing note some of the new theories that will most likely provide both excitement and constructive discomfort. We then begin to introduce two crucial issues: the contribution of HOs and their potential problems. Section 1.2 provides a systematic summary of all the chapters, and section 1.3 briefly speculates on the past, present and future of the study of HOs.

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Edited by David Billis and Colin Rochester

Hybrid Organisations – that integrate competing organisational principles – have become a preferred means of tackling the complexity of today's societal problems. One familiar set of examples are organisations that combine significant features from market, public and third sector organisations. Many different groundbreaking approaches to hybridity are contained in this Handbook, which brings together a collection of empirical studies from an international body of scholars. The chapters analyse and theorise the position of hybrid organisations and have important implications for theory, practice and policy in a context of proliferating hybrid forms of organisation.
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Colin Rochester, Angela Ellis Paine and Matt Hill

Volunteers are playing a growing and increasingly important role in organisations across all three sectors: public and private as well as third. Their contribution to third sector organisations is (on one level at least) fairly straightforward – the theoretical framework developed by David Billis (2010) identifies volunteers as the sector’s distinctive human resources – but the position with regard to the organisations in the other two sectors is more problematic. For Billis the private sector’s distinctive human resources are ‘paid employees’ while the public sector is staffed by ‘paid public servants’ (ibid., p. 55). Within Billis’s framework the presence of volunteers in these two sectors is in a sense anomalous and may indicate that an organisation in which they are involved contains elements of hybridity. In this chapter we discuss the role and status of volunteers in different kinds of organisation and review the ways in which their activities are organised. We have carried out this review in order to assess the extent to which the involvement of volunteers can be seen as a way of defining organisations as hybrid. Our discussion is largely centred on the experience of volunteering in England, although we will also take account of some relevant literature from elsewhere. Direct evidence of the changing nature or experience of volunteering in hybrid organisations is hard to find. Some commentators have discussed the implications of hybridity for volunteers within the third sector (see Hustinx, 2014; Ellis Paine et al., 2010) but there is less discussion of volunteering within other hybrid settings. Indeed, even within the field of third sector studies, as Warburton and McDonald (2009, p. 825) argue, ‘little is known about how these organisational changes impact upon the capacity and commitment of volunteers, and particularly those volunteers accustomed to working in a traditional institutional order’.