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Cyrine Ben-Hafaïedh

The quantitative and qualitative importance of entrepreneurial teams has been increasingly recognized in entrepreneurship theory but the overall number of research articles addressing this topic is still relatively low. While recent reviews on research on entrepreneurial teams exist, each with a specific focus (e.g., team diversity, cognition, intermediary mechanisms), this chapter advances existing knowledge by examining entrepreneurial teams in terms of movement. Movement is captured from a developmental stage perspective and the chapter uses this approach to critically review entrepreneurial team literature through the three main phases of an entrepreneurial team: forming, functioning and evolving. Thereafter, the chapter takes a more holistic approach and seeks to capture the weaker and stronger signals within the current evolution of entrepreneurial team research. In striving to identify the lessons that are being learned, the chapter also outlines how future research efforts could be reinforced and developed in the most impactful ways.

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Edited by Cyrine Ben-Hafaïedh and Thomas M. Cooney

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Cyrine Ben-Hafaïedh and Thomas M. Cooney

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Edited by Cyrine Ben-Hafaïedh and Thomas M. Cooney

This book reinforces the value and importance of entrepreneurial teams within the entrepreneurship literature. The expert group of contributors identifies and develops various key areas of research on entrepreneurship teams and suggests the way ahead for future research in the area. The contributors expand on the existing literature on entrepreneurial teams by first revisiting the most recent framework applied to entrepreneurial teams (that is the Inputs-Mediators-Outputs-Inputs model) and then advancing our understanding of issues such as formation, structuring, deep-level diversity and emergent states. The book additionally considers different contexts of application with reference to their commonalities and specificities and investigates under-researched areas such as entrepreneurial teams within indigenous communities, ethnically diverse groups and women entrepreneurs. The contributors present practice-relevant research and offer researchers a platform from which they can explore new insights into the phenomenon of entrepreneurial teams.