You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items

  • Author or Editor: Dallen J. Timothy x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Dallen J. Timothy

This content is available to you

Dallen J. Timothy

This chapter provides an overview of the history and development of globalization, its meaning and its manifestations in everyday life. It also applies these concepts to tourism-specific contexts within the framework of meanings and processes; human mobility, geopolitics, security and conflict; population and environmental challenges; innovation and technology; and other issues and mobility trends in today’s tourism marketplace. The chapter also outlines the conceptual development of the book and the contributions of the various authors.

You do not have access to this content

Dallen J. Timothy

Supranationalism is becoming more commonplace throughout the world, and almost every country on earth belongs to a supranational trading bloc. Supranationalism entails independent nation states giving up a degree of their sovereignty to participate in a multi-nation alliance the governs certain phenomena for the entire bloc, including for the individual states. We have seen many such regional alliances develop since WWII, with the European Union becoming the most thoroughly integrated. Trade blocs, customs unions and single markets are examples of supranationalism, all of which have major bearings on the growth and development of tourism through their policies of cross-border development, a unified currency and economic, supranational citizenship and free cross-border movement of people and goods, military cooperation for security, environmental protect, and infrastructure development. Several examples throughout the world are examined in this chapter in how supranationalism governance applies to tourism and its role in the globalization process.

You do not have access to this content

Dallen J. Timothy

This concluding chapter critically examines several key tourism concepts directly related to globalization but which have received relatively little academic attention. In particular, the chapter looks at changing technology and how it plays out on the tourism-globalization stage. It also examines other mobilities, including migration and diasporic travel, the fluid concept of ‘home’, medical mobility, and how tourist mobility has created impacts in places where tourism has not existed before. Cultural globalization is also analyzed, including pop culture, cross-border cultural routes, and cultural branding. Finally, the chapter teases out concepts related to place and placelessness through globalization and points on future research directions that are needed to understand globalization better in the realm of tourism.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Dallen J. Timothy

Globalization entails the world becoming a smaller place through political, socio-cultural and economic processes. These processes have salient implications for tourism, and tourism itself is one of the driving forces behind globalization. This book is a collection of conceptual treatises by international scholars about the dynamics and reach of globalization and its relationships with tourism. It anatomizes and deconstructs the global forces, processes and challenges that face the world of tourism. It is international in scope, encyclopedic in its conceptual depth, empirically evocative, and contemporary in its coverage.
You do not have access to this content

Dallen J. Timothy

This chapter argues that there is more cultural heritage worth protecting and promoting than only the grand, tangible and ancient human past that has long characterized the supply side of most mass heritage tourism. As part of the co-creative turn in tourism and as a manifestation of the experience economy, many niche travelers are seeking extraordinary experiences beyond the normative mass tourism-based heritage experience. Increasing numbers of tourists desire to see how ordinary people live(d) and are seeking deeper and more meaningful connections with local heritage. This chapter utilizes the examples of rural tourism/agritourism and indigenous tourism to show how vernacular heritage is becoming a more important part of the experiential tourism product. Although people still want to see and experience the famous and iconic heritage places, they are becoming more invested understanding how the peasants and the poor lived, not just the rich aristocracy.