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Edited by Dana Beldiman

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Dana Beldiman

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Edited by Dana Beldiman

As innovation processes become increasingly collaborative, new relationships among players in the innovation space emerge. These developments demand new legal structures that allow horizontally integrated, open and shared use of intellectual property (IP). This book examines the fundamental issues regarding the collaborative use of IP and discusses emerging trends including: the interpretation of FRAND terms in the context of standard essential patents; secondary liability of technology providers; contractual arrangements in trademark law, and the treatment of IP issues in specific emerging industries.
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Edited by Dana Beldiman

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Dana Beldiman

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Access to Information and Knowledge

21st Century Challenges in Intellectual Property and Knowledge Governance

Edited by Dana Beldiman

Massive quantities of information are required to fuel the innovation process in a knowledge-based economy; a requirement that is in tension with intellectual property (IP) laws. Against this backdrop, leading thinkers in the IP arena explore the ‘access challenge’ of the 21st century, framed as the tension between the interest in the free flow of information and the fragmentation of knowledge resulting from strong IP laws.
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Arpan Banerjee and Dana Beldiman

For German manufacturers with a global footprint, a regrettable fallout of the First World War was the loss of lucrative business in Britain, along with associated industrial property rights. The vast size of the British Empire at the time meant that this automatically translated into identical consequences in many British colonies. In one instance, one of the well-known German trade marks of the time, ‘Sanatogen’, was appropriated by a British company. After the War, the original owners of the mark attempted to reclaim it, based on provisions in the Versailles Treaty. This led to a significant trade mark infringement case at the Bombay High Court in British India, undoubtedly the largest and most important colony within the British Empire. The litigants in the case were the original German makers of Sanatogen (trading as AJ Wülfing) and an Indian firm distributing the British variant, also using the Sanatogen mark. This chapter looks back on this forgotten but fascinating case, unusual for interpreting trade mark law principles in accordance with provisions of the Versailles Treaty.