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Daniel Holland

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Daniel Holland and Michael Glauser

The Small Enterprise Education & Development (SEED) program provides a transformative international learning opportunity for students at Utah State University. The SEED students spend twelve weeks in a developing country to teach entrepreneurs fundamental business building principles, help secure funding through strategic partners, and provide ongoing mentoring as the entrepreneurs strive to grow their small businesses.

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Daniel V. Holland and Dean A. Shepherd

Entrepreneurial persistence occurs when the entrepreneur chooses to continue with an entrepreneurial opportunity regardless of counterinfluence or enticing alternatives. The decision to persist is influenced by personal characteristics and by feedback from the environment relative to thresholds. Using a conjoint experiment, we investigate how adversity and values influence the weight placed on the decision attributes for the persistence decisions of 100 entrepreneurs. The findings suggest that the persistence decision policies are heterogeneous depending on the level of adversity experienced and the individual values held by the entrepreneurs. The results provide interesting insights into why and how entrepreneurs choose to persist.
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Daniel V. Holland and Dean A. Shepherd

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Volker Bruns, Daniel V. Holland, Dean A. Shepherd and Johan Wiklund

Using human-capital perspective and the similarity-attraction paradigm, we examine the role of general and specific human capital in the decision policies of 114 Swedish loan officers in their assessments of small-business loan requests. We found that human capital characteristics had marginal impact on decision policy contingencies and that specific human capital had no significant influence on the probability of loan approval. However, we did find that the similarity between the loan officers' human capital and the applicants' human capital was a significant indicator of loan approval. The findings offer interesting insight into the heterogeneity of loan decisions processes and outcomes and future research opportunities are suggested.