You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items

  • Author or Editor: David Bright x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Felia Allum and David Bright

This chapter presents an overview of the presence of Italian mafias in Australia and compares the very different social and economic behaviours of the ‘Ndrangheta and the Neapolitan Camorra in that country. It considers the interplay of structural factors, contexts and conditions, drivers, facilitators and characteristics which have resulted in the ‘Ndrangheta becoming a territorially and politically rooted mafia in parts of Australia, while Camorra groups use it as a ‘marketplace’ in which to generate profit (exported to Italy) rather than for long-term settlement. On the basis of these case studies, the chapter problematises some of the existing theories on mafia expansions outside their territories of origin.

You do not have access to this content

David A. Bright and Carolien van Ham

This chapter explores the connections between organised crime groups and politics in Australia. There is considerable evidence of intersections between organised crime groups, including mafia groups and ethnic crime gangs, and politics at both state and federal levels in Australia. The interconnections include: (1) assassinations of politicians which have been linked to organised crime groups, especially those involved in drug trafficking; and (2) allegations of mafia ‘fundraising’ for political parties. The chapter analyses the interconnections between organised crime groups and politics in Australia, and locates them within the Australian socio-political context.

This content is available to you

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright

This content is available to you

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright

Classroom as Organization (CAO) is for educators looking for a creative way to engage students while creating a deep and meaningful learning experience. CAO is a powerful teaching methodology, particularly well-suited for teaching business topics, that can enliven students’ learning experience while giving them the opportunity to practice and develop workplace-related skills. The purpose of this book is to serve as a comprehensive resource for educators interested in adopting CAO. The intention is to enable more people to experiment and adopt this immersive, empowering, and relational teaching methodology. Chapter 1 begins with an overview of the historical context in which CAO emerged, and describes the teaching philosophy of educational constructivism that provides the theoretical basis for core teaching strategies in CAO. Building on this foundation, Chapter 2 explores specific considerations for using CAO, including fit with one’s teaching philosophy and instructional context. Chapter 3 offers a complete CAO course design for an upper-level organizational behavior course, OB Inc., explained in the context of the considerations discussed in Chapter 2. A set of appendices are provided that enable educators to adopt and adapt the design. Chapter 4 provides an annotated bibliography of 40 seminal articles in the CAO literature. If you are not familiar with CAO, this book provides a comprehensive resource. If you are familiar with CAO, but have been afraid to try it, this book provides the support to take the next step in your practice of experiential teaching and learning.

You do not have access to this content

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright

This chapter begins with an overview of the historical context in which CAO emerged. The term “Classroom as Organization” is located within the origins of the field of organizational behavior and linked to the principles underpinning T-groups. Next, the teaching philosophy of educational constructivism is introduced as the theoretical basis for core teaching strategies that underpin CAO: authentic learning, flipped classroom, and learning by teaching. The chapter synthesizes the CAO literature by identifying seminal articles, tracing the expansion of the methodology, and identifying themes such as the distinction between interdependent organization and leadered group designs. Finally, recognizing the diversity of both published and unpublished CAO designs, the chapter discusses common elements in CAO designs, including to: (1) leverage interdependence; (2) utilize peer assessment; (3) give students both learning and management roles; (4) delegate as a senior manager; and (5) balance structure and ambiguity to support learning.

You do not have access to this content

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright

Chapter 2 explores key considerations for designing and/or using CAO. Specifically, this it addresses the question of whether CAO is a good fit and key design elements to take into consideration. Whether the educator is creating an original CAO or implementing an existing design from the literature, there are two types of consideration. The first group of considerations address whether CAO is a good fit with the educator’s teaching philosophy, the institutional context, the basic parameters of the course, and the cognitive and affective learning objectives. Once it is determined that CAO is a good fit, another set of considerations relate to specific design elements of the CAO, including organizational design, team descriptions, peer teaching, peer assessment, assessment structures, and end-of-semester evaluation. The intention is to assist educators in understanding the inner workings of the CAO methodology and assessing its utility for a given class.

You do not have access to this content

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright

Chapter 3 offers a complete CAO course design for an upper-level organizational behavior course: OB Inc. Based on the authors’ experience, OB Inc. is explained in the context of the considerations discussed in Chapter 2. The detailed course template of OB Inc. adds a comprehensive example of a specific CAO to the existing literature. A complete set of appendices are provided that enable educators to adopt and adapt this design. The intention is to offer educators new to CAO an option for their first CAO course.

You do not have access to this content

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright

Chapter 4 provides an annotated bibliography of seminal articles in the CAO literature. CAO sits within the broader domain of experience-based learning. However, this bibliography focuses directly on CAO. For example, articles that mention CAO but are ultimately about a broader topic, such as experiential learning, are not included. The bibliography is structured in chronological order from the first mention of CAO in the management literature.

You do not have access to this content

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright

You do not have access to this content

Debby R. Thomas, Stacie F. Chappell and David S. Bright