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David Campbell

It is a striking feature of the conventional understanding of the general principles of remedies for breach of contract that, though sale of goods cases are of course often cited ad hoc, the basic structure of the overwhelmingly most important remedy for breach, market damages under Pt V of the Sale of Goods Act 1893 (Pt VI under the 1979 Act), typically receives little attention. Through a criticism of this conventional understanding focused on one of the principal statements of the general principles, Cheshire, Fifoot and Furmston’s Law of Contract, it will be argued that this curious situation arises because market damages are difficult to reconcile with the classical law of contract, which sees the proper purpose of remedies as vindication of the interests of the claimant. The ultimately reluctant acknowledgement of the thoroughgoing limitations on such vindication which the positive law exhaustively demonstrates is an inadequate response to the true purpose of remedies, which is to facilitate a cooperative response to misallocations of goods. This purpose is fully illustrated by an adequate understanding of the market damages.

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David E. Campbell

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David Campbell and Matthias Klaes

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David Campbell and Matthias Klaes

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David Campbell and Dennis Pendleton

This chapter explores two case narratives of engaged scholarship, drawing on the authors’ experiences as university scholars promoting community development through engagement with local citizens, public officials, and community-based organizations. The narratives provide a textured understanding of how engagement is constrained by routine, deeply embedded practices and assumptions, but also of how, despite this, space for more robust, democratic engagement can be created.

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Edited by Roger Halson and David Campbell

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Edited by Roger Halson and David Campbell

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Edited by Roger Halson and David Campbell

This Research Handbook comprehensively and authoritatively reviews the contemporary challenges in research regarding remedies in private law. The Research Handbook on Remedies in Private Law focuses on the most important issues throughout contract, equity, restitution and tort law as they have arisen in the major common law jurisdictions, touching upon those of other jurisdictions where pertinent.
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Ben Campbell and David Kryscynski

Starting from a traditional strategy perspective, we explore several common pathways through which firms can leverage isolating mechanisms to create and capture different types of rents from individuals’ human capital. Across the range of exemplar human capital rent types, we argue that the characteristics of the underlying human capital are of limited importance to the existence of human capital rents. Instead, a focus on human capital rents should give primacy to the management systems that create the isolating mechanisms that allow for the creation of such rents. In other words, we argue that most of the advantages we ascribe to individual-level human capital may actually reside in the human resource (HR) system. Accordingly, we call for strategic human capital scholars to more explicitly draw upon the rich tools and history of HR scholarship in order to better understand the sources of human capital-based competitive advantages.