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Michael Isichei and David G. Collings

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David G. Collings and Michael Isichei

Over the past decade global talent management (GTM) has emerged as a key theme in the field of international human resource management (IHRM). A key element of the global talent strategies of many multinational enterprises has been the international mobility of employees, illustrating the central role of expatriation in GTM. However, little is known about the relationship between GTM and global mobility, particularly the implications of GTM for individual expatriates. Much of the literature that has considered the relationship between GTM and global mobility has taken an organizational perspective, foregrounding organizational objectives while relegating individual assignee perspectives to the background. Unlike much of the literature on the topic, this chapter will consider what GTM means for individual expatriates. Using the expat cycle – which considers the pre-assignment, assignment, and post assignment stages of an international assignment, the chapter considers how global talent systems impact the decisions individuals make around global mobility, their experiences while on assignment, and the career implications of global mobility in light of global talent systems.

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David G. Collings and Hugh Scullion

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Tony Dundon and David G. Collings

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Kieran M. Conroy and David G. Collings

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David G. Collings, Anthony McDonnell and John McMackin

This chapter evaluates the literature on talent management and establishes key trends in the research. It differentiates research that treats talent as a subject (where every individual’s strengths should be harnessed for the organisation’s benefit, the motivational effects associated with being classified as talent, and the attention that must therefore be given to the role of objective, fair, and transparent processes of identification), and research that treats talent as an object (where attention is given to the ability, competence, performance, and behaviours of a subset of the workforce that makes them comparatively more important than everyone else in terms of the value they add to corporate performance). It argues that by looking at the interplay between critical roles and talent in isolation, we can avoid the limitations of early research that segmented employees. It identifies three trends that will drive the talent agenda: the interface of talent management and performance management; the importance of context in talent management research; and how to engage this talent and maximise their contribution and rewards for sustainable organisation performance.

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David G. Collings, Jonathan Lavelle and Patrick Gunnigle

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Geoffrey Wood, Alexandros Psychogios, Leslie T. Szamosi and David G. Collings

This chapter develops understanding of how context influences human resource management (HRM). Exploring relevant institutional factors, the complementarities of regulatory features of an organisation’s environment are discussed. The authors highlight some of the most influential institutional approaches to understanding variations in HRM policy and practice, and draw out the implications of recent theoretical developments. The authors define the institutional context, particularly highlighting how this affects employee rights.

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Geoffrey Wood, Alexandros Psychogios, Leslie T. Szamosi and David G. Collings