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David Coen and Wyn Grant

This comprehensive research review identifies the key articles on relations between business and government from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. The editors have selected works that explore the themes of business and the state, organizing the firm for political action, managing government affairs, lobbying models, business governance and regulation, comparative business and political systems and internationaliastion and transanational business regulation. With an original introduction by the editor, this research review is an essential resource for scholars, students and policymakers interested in political science, business studies and economics.
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David Coen and Wyn Grant

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David Coen and Wyn Grant

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David Coen and Wyn Grant

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Richard Hall and David Grant

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Rachel Harrison and David Grant

Insolvency of natural persons, or individual insolvency, is called ‘bankruptcy’ in England and Wales. Both corporate insolvency and personal insolvency are governed by the Insolvency Act 1986 and the Insolvency Rules 2016. As well as bankruptcy, there are other options for debtors who do not wish to become bankrupt. These involve paying off debts in instalments through the establishment of a Debt Management Plan, an Administration Order, or an Individual Voluntary Arrangement. If repayment is not a viable option for the debtor, he can apply for a Debt Relief Order or a Bankruptcy Order. The debtor’s choice will take several factors into account, chiefly the extent and nature of his debt, and his disposable income and assets. English law is perceived as one of the most ‘debtor-friendly’ systems among EU Member States due to its breadth of applicability, relative simplicity and automatic discharge.

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David B. Grant and Sarah Shaw

Organizations are looking to adopt environmental or sustainable performance management standards and certifications for their supply chains to satisfy stakeholder concerns and to respond to increasing awareness and interest in sustainability. However, there are several challenges regarding which standards and/or certifications organizations should adopt. This chapter discusses these issues; examines 19popular standard and certification schemes; considers three key functional supply chain activities as regards available schemes, buildings and facilities, production and operations and transportation; and provides suggestions for further research into this topic’s continuing challenges.

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David Grant and Lyria Bennett Moses

Chapter 1 presents the principal argument of the book, that Technology is best understood within the context of a broad historical trajectory. The notion of the trajectory emerges from a critique and elaboration of two elements of major works by Hans Blumenberg: the concept of a modern mythology and the legitimacy of the modern age. This chapter argues that modern mythological magnitudes – Deity, State and Market – have been imagined as archetypally fearsome entities to deal with our existential concerns, and each has an associated regime of practice promoted by a dominant interest and which constitutes at the same time both the subjection of the individual and the empowerment of the magnitude and of those interests. Because of their fearsomeness, the claim is made by respective dominant interests that each magnitude will, on condition of the subjection of individuals, eliminate their existential concerns and deliver sympathetic conditions to them. Technology is the subject of the latest of such systematic claims, in this case that individuals will be empowered to overcome such concerns by being enabled to create the conditions of their own existence, an Absolutism of the Subject. It is argued that the production of a regime of self-responsibility rather than of subjection offers a way out of this mythological maze.

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David Grant and Lyria Bennett Moses

Chapter 2 elaborates the dynamic of the mythological trajectory. It explains how Deity, State and Market were, in turn, each imagined as absolute then slowly engaged to be sympathetic, on condition of individual subjection. It explains how the archetypally fearsome status of each magnitude is degraded by this engagement, leading to the search for a replacement magnitude. By this series, the trajectory has been created. Given the failure of the archetypal Market, the chapter concludes by presenting a detailed explanation of the contemporary emergence of Technology as the means by which the latest element of the trajectory, the idea of the Absolute Subject, is being created.