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David Zilberman and Scott Kaplan

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Doris Schroeder and David Kaplan

This chapter argues that a just concept of responsible research and innovation (RRI) has to be global. Three prominent definitions of RRI are surveyed to assess their suitability for globalization. The foundational principles of the von Schomberg definition (ethical acceptability, sustainability and societal desirability) are then taken forward in a comparison with the concept of inclusive innovation. Inclusive innovation is a term widely used by international agencies, such as the World Bank, and middle-income economy governments (China, India, Brazil and South Africa). Bringing out the parallels between societal desirability and inclusive innovation as well as their connection to the grand challenges of humankind leads to the conclusion that RRI can go global.

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David M. Kaplan and Jerome A. Katz

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David Zilberman, Scott Kaplan, Eunice Kim and Gina Waterfield

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Anna B. Kayes, David M. Kaplan, Jane Burdett and Sharon L. O'Sullivan

Once employees have been hired, it cannot be assumed that they will flourish in their jobs. Job specifications – even ones that have been recently updated – will change as the competitive landscape changes, and employees’ skills need continually to be assessed, developed, and managed. How organizations develop their talents, especially in knowledge work environments, is key to organizational competitiveness: being able to compete in a constantly changing, global marketplace and ensuring employees continue to grow and develop in their careers. Featured among these exercises are one two which enable students to develop a training plan, another which requires critical thinking to discover what went wrong in such a process, and the first which takes a broad look at the war on talent.

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David M. Kaplan, Julie Palmer, Katina Thompson, Susan Dustin, Christina Arroyo, Sanjeewa Perera and Robert D. Marx

Once a job is evaluated and designed the process for filling the position begins. Decisions to be made include: determining the labor needs both now and in the future, where to advertise the job, whether to look internally first, what kind of special considerations might be made, and the criteria for selection. While this may sound simple, there is a mountain of research that demonstrates biases – both conscious and unconscious – that get in the way of making the best selection decisions. Included in this chapter are several exercises that enable students to experience the challenges of hiring employees, including special cases where diversity, overqualification, and group roles in decision-making processes are potential issues.