You are looking at 1 - 10 of 78 items

  • Author or Editor: Dean A. Shepherd x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Candida Brush, Michael A. Hitt, R. Duane Ireland and Dean A. Shepherd

You do not have access to this content

Mason A. Carpenter, Melissa S. Cardon, Jeffrey. S. McMullen and Dean A. Shepherd

You do not have access to this content

Volker Bruns, Daniel V. Holland, Dean A. Shepherd and Johan Wiklund

Using human-capital perspective and the similarity-attraction paradigm, we examine the role of general and specific human capital in the decision policies of 114 Swedish loan officers in their assessments of small-business loan requests. We found that human capital characteristics had marginal impact on decision policy contingencies and that specific human capital had no significant influence on the probability of loan approval. However, we did find that the similarity between the loan officers' human capital and the applicants' human capital was a significant indicator of loan approval. The findings offer interesting insight into the heterogeneity of loan decisions processes and outcomes and future research opportunities are suggested.
You do not have access to this content

J. Michael Haynie, Dean A. Shepherd, Jeffrey S. McMullen and James O. Fiet

You do not have access to this content

Dean A. Shepherd, Holger Patzelt and Robert A. Baron

Some managers and entrepreneurs decide to act in ways that result in harm to the natural environment, despite the fact that such actions violate their own values. Building on moral self regulation theory (Bandura, 1991), we propose that entrepreneurs’ assessments of the attractiveness of opportunities that harm the natural environment depend on the simultaneous impact of values and personal agency. By cognitively disengaging their pro-environmental values, decision makers (i.e., entrepreneurs) can (under certain circumstances) perceive opportunities that harm the environment as highly attractive and thus suitable for exploitation. The results of a judgment task that generated 1,264 opportunity assessments nested within 83 business founders offered support for this general prediction and indicated that the extent of founders’ disengagement of their pro-environmental values was stronger when they had high, rather than low, entrepreneurial self-efficacy, and stronger when industry munificence was perceived as low rather than high. We discuss our new measure of moral disengagement in a decision-making context and the implications of the study’s findings for extant literatures on moral disengagement and sustainable entrepreneurship.
You do not have access to this content

Denis A. Grégoire, Pamela S. Barr and Dean A. Shepherd

You do not have access to this content

Dean A. Shepherd, Holger Patzelt and Robert A. Baron

You do not have access to this content

Mathew L.A. Hayward, Dean A. Shepherd and Dale Griffin

You do not have access to this content

J. Michael Haynie, Dean A. Shepherd and Jeffery S. McMullen

We apply the prescriptions of the resource-based perspective to develop a model of entrepreneurial opportunity evaluation. We propose that opportunity evaluation decision policies are constructed as future oriented, cognitive representations of ‘what will be’, assuming one were to exploit the opportunity under evaluation. These cognitive representations incorporate both (1) an evaluation of the existing resource endowments (already under the control of the venture), which may be employed to exploit the opportunity under evaluation, and at the same time (2) an assessment of the future, wealth generating resources that must be marshalled (and subsequently under the control of the venture) in order to exploit the opportunity under evaluation.
You do not have access to this content

Judith Behrens, Holger Ernst and Dean A. Shepherd

Research and development (R & D) generates projects, but the question often remains: which projects should be exploited? Building on the innovation, strategy, and managerial cognition literatures, we use a conjoint field experiment to collect data on 4032 decisions made by 126 R & D managers to test how project attributes, strategic context, and managers’ characteristics influence innovation exploitation decisions. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we find that (1) experience impacts project exploitation decision policies of middle managers more than senior managers, (2) divergent thinking across middle and senior managers increases with experience, and (3) experienced middle managers diverge from experienced senior managers in their decisions to exploit opportunities by placing greater emphasis on strategic context (relative to competitors and fit within the portfolio) and lesser emphasis on uncertainty (technological and demand). These findings have implications for the strategy and innovation literature.