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Deni Ruggeri

How can stories be employed in the community development process in order to better understand, analyse, plan and implement sustainable development and landscape democracy? And how can storytelling move a community from inaction to collective, democratic action? This chapter focuses on the Italian new town of Zingonia to illustrate the relevance of stories as structures of social and communal identity, as a window into a place’s native wisdom, and as tools for urban resiliency. The 1960s Italian community stands as a critical case study of a storytelling-based, participatory approach to community redevelopment. The goal of this digital ethnography is to represent a rich account of the challenges and opportunities Modernist communities face as they attempt to rewrite their core story into one of democratic landscape change.

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Edited by Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

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Defining Landscape Democracy

A Path to Spatial Justice

Edited by Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

This stimulating book explores theories, conceptual frameworks, and cultural approaches with the purpose of uncovering a cross-cultural understanding of landscape democracy, a concept at the intersection of landscape, democracy and spatial justice. The authors of Defining Landscape Democracy address a number of questions that are critical to the contemporary discourse on the right to landscape: Why is democracy relevant to landscape? How do we democratise landscape? How might we achieve landscape and spatial justice?
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Edited by Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

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Edited by Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

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Edited by Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

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Shelley Egoz, Karsten Jørgensen and Deni Ruggeri

In order to make a case for landscape democracy, one would need to acknowledge the political potency of landscape and its universal value. The main axiom is that landscape is a life-supporting system of material and emotional needs and a common resource. Democracy itself is an elastic concept and does not always deliver equality and social justice. Landscape democracy is a complex concept influenced and shaped by multiple variables requiring mindfulness of context and nuances. Yet the main message is that while each situation has to be handled according to specific social and cultural manners, the underlying doctrine must remain an ethical commitment to justice in terms of social equity.