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Denise Fletcher

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Denise Fletcher and Tony Watson

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Denise Fletcher and Paul Selden

In this chapter, we discuss the dominant tendency in entrepreneurship research to objectify the notion of context and the limitations this engenders for understanding how context is related to the real-time emergence of entrepreneurial processes. We contribute to the increasing efforts to theorize context by presenting a relational conception of context which explains how the interrelationship of multiple contexts and agency is constitutive of action (interpretive and social) in real-time emergence. This conceptualization has important implications for identifying, selecting and integrating contexts in entrepreneurial explanations because it connects multiple contexts with the spatio-temporal specifics of actioned events.

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Denise Fletcher, Robert Huggins and Lenny Koh

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Edited by Ulla Hytti, Robert Blackburn, Denise Fletcher and Friederike Welter

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Ulla Hytti, Robert Blackburn, Denise Fletcher and Friederike Welter

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Entrepreneurship, Universities & Resources

Frontiers in European Entrepreneurship Research

Edited by Ulla Hytti, Robert Blackburn, Denise Fletcher and Friederike Welter

The role of resources is pivotal in entrepreneurship for the success of new and small ventures, though most face resource constraints. The book offers multiple perspectives on analysing and understanding the importance of resources in entrepreneurship development. Approaching the subject with both a practice-theory and research-based approach, the contributors analyse topics such as processes and structures in social entrepreneuring; entrepreneurship and equity in crowdfunding; and forming alliances with large firms to overcome resource constraints. The contributors provide evidence, for example, on how business angels can contribute more than finance to small ventures and how the flexibility of resources is important in internationalisation.