You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items

  • Author or Editor: Dieter Bögenhold x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold

You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold

You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold and Uwe Fachinger

Business ownership and self-employment are increasing dramatically among women, raising the question of motives behind this development. Is it driven by necessity, or does it reflect new modes of labour market integration and a strategy for women to achieve a better work–life balance? Combining conceptual thoughts with the exploitation of German Microcensus data over the period 1989–2009, Dieter Bögenhold and Uwe Fachinger explore the possible influence of personal, household and labour market characteristics in a family context on the probability of being self-employed. The labour market integration of women through self-employment appears highly contextual, with the occurrence of multiple factors related to the family life.

You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold and Uwe Fachinger

You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold and Uwe Fachinger

You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold and Uwe Fachinger

You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold, Jarna Heinonen and Elisa Akola

Dieter Bögenhold, Jarna Heinonen and Elisa Akola explore the overlapping areas of entrepreneurship, self-employment and professions. Their study presents empirical findings obtained from a unique Finnish survey including freelance journalists, translators and interpreters, and artists at the blurred boundaries between waged work and entrepreneurship. The manifestations of entrepreneurship vary, reflecting the work and the labor market situation within these professions. Many different socioeconomic situations can be found ‘in between’, which are driven by different social logics. In such circumstances, the term ‘entrepreneurship’ can be misused when it is used indiscriminately and, therefore, can easily generate myths and stereotypes, which are challenged by the study.

You do not have access to this content

Dieter Bögenhold, Andrea Klinglmair, Zulaicha Parastuty and Florian Kandutsch

The complex interaction of technological development, globalisation and socio-demographic change has accelerated a structural change in the economy, resulting in a changing working environment and new forms of employment. In the field of self-employment, an emerging trend can be observed towards one-person enterprises, which already represent more than 50 per cent of all Austrian companies. The primary aim of this chapter is to analyse the rationalities of these microenterprises based on an empirical online survey of one-person enterprises in Carinthia. We find that one-person entrepreneurs are mainly driven by motives like self-realisation or working without hierarchies. However, there are also one-person entrepreneurs who have been crowded out from the (dependent) labour market and are therefore driven by economic reasons (e.g. self-employment as an alternative to unemployment). This economically driven group of one-person enterprises is comparatively dissatisfied with their professional situation, is less optimistic regarding their entrepreneurial future, and generates lower incomes.