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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter lays out how the social functions of emotion, or deviations from it, can be co-opted to serve as a means of social control. The term ‘emotion’ is defined consistent with the key construct emotion regulation and the notion of emancipation as featured in critical theory. The literature on the functions of emotion is also discussed, as well as how these functions manifest themselves across levels of analysis. These steps permit introducing the reader to two pathways of social control. This chapter features a range of vignettes to contextualize how each emotion in question can be used to control behaviour in organizations. Finally, the chapter joins these insights with the literature on critical theory to maintain that the social functions of emotion constitute a sophisticated system of repression, the seeing through of which can potentially spark within repressed workers a desire to emancipate themselves from these conditions.

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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter outlines the theoretical and empirical findings associated with Gross’s widely used process model of emotion regulation. Building upon this, the chapter proceeds to explore specific emotion regulation strategies in order to show how they differentially apply to, and impact on, the two pathways to social control introduced in Chapter 2. Through detailed description, the chapter lays out what the current appraisal might look like for each emotion of interest in this book (shame, guilt, happiness, anger), which, in turn, gives rise to adverse psychological, physiological and social consequences. This is followed by suggestions as to how these emotions might be regulated differently (compared to the status quo) to alleviate these adverse consequences. However, consistent with the clarifications offered in Chapter 1, the author refrains from predicting what the ‘new’ consequences for workers might be – other than suggesting a lower likelihood of adverse consequences materializing if workers adopted these suggestions.

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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter offers a comprehensive synthesis of the preceding chapters. It does so by mapping out the entire process of how each pathway to social control, with its unique characteristics, relates to specific emotions. Through a different approach to emotion regulation, the author suggests that this can eventually raise the possibility of a critical mass emerging for what is described as micro-emancipation of workers. However, the author emphasizes that it is the sense-making processes of workers that will eventually influence whether an effect will occur and, more importantly, how the effect manifests itself in the phenomenological world of workers.

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Dirk Lindebaum

Emotion is often used by organisations to manipulate and repress workers. However, this repression can have adverse psychological and social consequences for them. This book articulates the pathways through which this repression occurs, and offers emotion regulation as a tool for workers to emancipate themselves from this repression and social control.
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Dirk Lindebaum

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Dirk Lindebaum

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Edited by Dirk Lindebaum, Deanna Geddes and Peter J. Jordan

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Dirk Lindebaum, Deanna Geddes and Peter J. Jordan

Our introduction explains the theme of this edited volume, namely, an exploration of workplace emotion from a social functional perspective in relation to societal ‘talk about emotion’. We examine conditions under which they can be at odds with, as well as reinforce each other in organizations, and occasions when both practices can occur simultaneously. Our hope is that this focus injects fresh theoretical and practical momentum into understanding how our talking about emotion can generate changes in emotion-eliciting events over time and place, which in turn can influence various causes, expressions, and consequences of emotions at work. This introductory chapter (and subsequent chapters) shed further light on the ramifications for social functional accounts of emotion, especially in the context of work environments. We also briefly foreshadow chapter contents in alphabetical order by emotion (i.e., awe, anger, boredom, envy, fear, happiness, pride, sadness, schadenfreude, and shame) and conclude with possible directions for future research.

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Edited by Dirk Lindebaum, Deanna Geddes and Peter J. Jordan

What novel theoretical insights can be gleaned by comparing our theoretical understanding of emotion in relation to how we 'talk about’ emotion at work? Drawing from psychological and sociological thinking, leading emotion researchers respond to this question for ten common and powerful emotions at work. The chapters detail various conditions under which our study of emotions and our talk about them can be at odds or reinforce each other in organizations, and how these differences impact subsequent consequences for organizations and their members.