You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items

  • Author or Editor: Eddy Van de Voorde x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Eddy Van de Voorde

You do not have access to this content

Eddy Van de Voorde

Many ports and airports operate in a highly competitive environment. But there may also be situations where some actors hold significant market power, with the risk of that power being abused. At that time, benchmarking of ports and airports as a whole, as well as of the individual actors, can be helpful in identifying potential problems of inefficiency and /or abuse of monopoly power. This chapter considers two case studies, one concerning alleged State aid in the Antwerp seaport and the other the economic regulation of the Brussels Airport Company. The underlying idea is that each case and the corresponding learning process can offer potential input for similar situations in other countries.

You do not have access to this content

Eddy Van de Voorde and Chris Nash

Ports and airports, important links in the transport system, are subject to significant competition. Many actors are involved in the process. As a result, that competition is influenced by a multitude of related and sometimes even conflicting interests. The question is whether all ports and airports do face strong competition. There may be a case in which one or more forms of market failure lead to allocative inefficiency. This chapter takes a closer look at whether ports and airports always operate in a competitive environment or not. In the latter case there might be a need for regulation. If so, should regulation be applied to all ports and / or airports? If we regulate, do we opt for structural regulation focusing on market structure, or conduct regulation seeking to influence the behavior of firms?

You do not have access to this content

Hilde Meersman, Eddy Van de Voorde and Thierry Vanelslander

You do not have access to this content

Hilde Meersman, Siri Pettersen Strandenes and Eddy Van de Voorde

You do not have access to this content

Hilde Meersman, Eddy Van de Voorde and Thierry Vanelslander

You do not have access to this content

Tom Pauwels, Eddy Van de Voorde and Thierry Vanelslander

You do not have access to this content

Rosário Macário, Hilde Meersman and Eddy van de Voorde

Transport is a major contributor to the European economy, accounting for 4.8 per cent of gross value added across the 28 EU countries (€548 bn) and 11 million jobs (UK included). Transport is fundamental for development at all scales of human life – local, rural, urban, metropolitan, regional, national, large-scale, and global. Many challenges exist that must be addressed by transport policy, from use of new intelligent technology to the need to promote a more inclusive society. These issues are complex, involving multiple and often competing interests. Mobility is an important way to provide accessibility, which supports economic development and social inclusion, but other contributors are also important, such as activity locations, land use policy and also energy, safety and security, etc. European transport policy is currently driven by a small number of long-term macro objectives: an inclusive society; connectivity of the different transport networks; and resilience of the transport systems to ensure sustainable cities and territories. This chapter addresses the main challenges faced by this sector while pursuing those objectives.

You do not have access to this content

Roel Gevaers, Jochen Maes, Eddy Van de Voorde and Thierry Vanelslander