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Elaine Farndale

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Jaap Paauwe and Elaine Farndale

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Jaap Paauwe and Elaine Farndale

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Elaine Farndale, Wolfgang Mayrhofer and Chris Brewster

The subject of comparative human resource management (HRM) and its boundaries are established, discussing the role of context in HRM. The question is then raised whether globalisation is making such an analysis increasingly irrelevant as societies seem to converge. To investigate convergence further, the chapter explores levels and units of analysis of comparative HRM. The chapter also outlines the shape and content of the Handbook, which includes theoretical and empirical issues in comparative HRM, the way that these affect particular elements of HRM, and the way that different countries and regions think about the topic.

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Elaine Farndale, Irene Nikandrou and Leda Panayotopoulou

This chapter highlights commonalities within nations, but differences between nations, to present a cross-national comparison of recruitment and selection practices. The authors examine how these practices relate to, interact with, and are influenced by the national institutional and cultural context. The chapter reflects on recruitment and selection practice variation between nations.

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Paul Boselie, Elaine Farndale and Jaap Paauwe

This chapter defines performance management from an international perspective, and presents an overview of the most important developments over time, comparing performance management in different contexts using both case study data from large multinational corporations and national survey data. Focusing on country-level data, the chapter explores the balance between the need to standardize or localize performance management practice in different types of organization across the globe.

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Wolfgang Mayrhofer, Chris Brewster and Elaine Farndale

This chapter brings the Handbook to a conclusion, drawing together common themes from across all chapters, mapping the field of comparative human resource management (CHRM). The authors conclude with a reflection of the challenges that remain for comparative analyses, commenting on how the field might continue to develop in the future. Calls are made for a greater range of countries and country clusters to be covered by comparative analyses (which this Handbook has already started to address), as well as demanding greater clarity in the HRM phenomena that are being compared. By adopting more rigorous methodologies and stronger theorizing for comparisons, this will improve the ability to explain rather than just describe the differences and similarities observed across different contexts.

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Edited by Chris Brewster, Wolfgang Mayrhofer and Elaine Farndale

This second, updated and extended edition of the Handbook of Research on Comparative Human Resource Management draws on the work of many of the world’s leading researchers in the field to present the state of the art to scholars, students and practitioners. The Handbook provides a detailed focus on the theoretical underpinnings of Comparative HRM, on comparative studies of specific areas of HRM practice and on the unique features of HRM in all the main regions of the world.
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Paul Boselie, Elaine Farndale and Jaap Paauwe

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Paul Boselie, Jaap Paauwe and Elaine Farndale