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Emily Chamlee-Wright

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Emily Chamlee-Wright

The early chapters that appear in this volume sketch out a program of study in what I have elsewhere described as “cultural economy”—a framework of thought that recognizes that economic, political and social entrepreneurs are situated within a particular cultural context, see the world and identify opportunities through a culturally defined lens and draw upon cultural narratives to make sense of the world and carve out strategies of effective action. This chapter examines the role that church pastors played in post-disaster recovery in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. The chapter argues that New Orleans pastors were both enabled and constrained by the cultural context in which they operated and that the narratives from which they drew shaped their strategies for action. Further, the chapter describes how New Orleans pastors navigated, deployed and in some cases manipulated socially embedded resources in order to devise and carry out strategies for post-disaster recovery. These cases advance the cultural economy project by examining the ways in which social entrepreneurs, though sometimes constrained by the positions they hold within a cultural context, will also call upon, shift and deploy socially embedded resources as they pursue their development strategies.

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Don Lavoie and Emily Chamlee-Wright

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Emily Chamlee-Wright and Virgil Henry Storr

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Emily Chamlee-Wright and Virgil Henry Storr

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Edited by Emily Chamlee-Wright and Virgil Henry Storr

In 2005 Hurricane Katrina posed an unprecedented set of challenges to formal and informal systems of disaster response and recovery. Informed by the Virginia School of Political Economy, the contributors to this study critically examine the public policy environment that led to both successes and failures in the post-Katrina disaster response and long-term recovery. Building from this perspective, this book lends critical insight into the nature of the social coordination problems disasters present, the potential for public policy to play a positive role, and the inherent limitations policymakers face in overcoming the myriad challenges that are a product of catastrophic disaster.
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Emily Chamlee-Wright and Joshua C. Hall

Many young economists become bogged down in the first few years of teaching because they have had neither the time nor the experience nor the mentoring to think through and develop how best to structure their syllabus. By 'syllabus structure'the authors do not mean which readings are assigned, when they are assigned or what textbook will be used. Instead, they are concerned about how exactly a faculty member's expectations of the students are expressed to the students through the class syllabus. Young faculty members can encounter difficulties because of differences between their expectations and those of the students. The most obvious case of this is with respect to grading, but teaching is filled with other examples such as office hours, participation and so forth. In the chapter, the authors provide and discuss syllabus language that touches on three different areas of expectation management: managing out-of-class time, leading effective classroom discussion and setting and maintaining grading expectations.