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Emma Parry

This chapter draws upon existing research in order to examine the current state of knowledge in relation to age and careers. In doing this, it examines the process of the career and how this might develop across the life course, but also investigates the impact on age on individuals’ conceptalizations of career success and on individual preferences for career outcomes. The chapter seeks to synthesize what is a somewhat disparate literature in order to identify the practical implications of what is already known about age and careers and to suggest areas for future research.

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Peter Urwin and Emma Parry

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Emma Parry, Julie Unite, Katharina Chudzikowski, Jon P Briscoe and Yan Shen

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Emma Parry, Michael Dickmann, Julie Unite, Yan Shen and Jon Briscoe

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Jon P. Briscoe, Michael Dickmann, Douglas T. Hall, Emma Parry and Wolfgang Mayrhofer

This chapter outlines the formation and ongoing development of a cross-cultural research team studying careers. Our focus is less upon research methodology explicitly, but more upon the group development and leadership issues that naturally emerge in such an undertaking. In the early stages of the team, member selection and the establishment of group norms were key. In the next stage of growth, broader contributions were needed involving research expertise and a wider range of personal styles, both within the team leadership as well as in the group at large. As the team embarks upon a new stage of transition, there is a need to honor their cultural and methodological traditions while being flexible enough to grow and take risks.

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Mila Lazarova, Wolfgang Mayrhofer, Jon Briscoe, Michael Dickmann, Douglas T. Hall and Emma Parry

This chapter explores the emergent field of study of comparative careers. The authors point to examples that illustrate relevant current research, providing definitions of key concepts and examples of comparative analyses in studies of individual careers and organisational career management. Survey results from two leading-edge career-related research projects are presented to illustrate current trends in the field.