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Emmanuele Pavolini

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Edited by Tanja Klenk and Emmanuele Pavolini

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Emmanuele Pavolini and Tanja Klenk

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Tanja Klenk and Emmanuele Pavolini

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Restructuring Welfare Governance

Marketization, Managerialism and Welfare State Professionalism

Edited by Tanja Klenk and Emmanuele Pavolini

This innovative book explores the introduction and impact of marketization and managerialism in social policy by adopting a dual perspective, considering both governance and human resources. Welfare governance (e.g. welfare mix, regulation, employment conditions, customer involvement) has changed significantly in the past decade. The editors and contributors collectively assesses these processes not only by comparing different policy fields and countries, but also by taking a close look inside organizations, examining the coping strategies of professionals, and how they adapt to new models of governing welfare organizations.
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Costanzo Ranci, Mauro Pellegrino and Emmanuele Pavolini

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Taco Brandsen, Emmanuele Pavolini, Costanzo Ranci, Birgit Sittermann and Annette Zimmer

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Roberto Moscati, Alberto Stanchi, Matteo Turri, Massimiliano Vaira and Emmanuele Pavolini

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Ellen Kuhlmann, Claudia B Maier, Gilles Dussault, Christa Larsen, Emmanuele Pavolini and Marius-Ionuț Ungureanu

Ellen Kuhlmann and others explain the effects of EU Health Law and Policy on health professionals. Drawing on new empirical data, they show how the EU’s free movement law, combined with its fiscal disciplines, have challenging effects on sustainability of healthcare systems. Professional mobility is based on the logic of individual rights and opportunities for health professionals, which clashes with the population-based logic of healthcare systems when health professionals are free to move – reducing accountability and draining a country of a qualified medical workforce. While some improvements have been made, notably through the Working Time Directive, moves in this area are still framed in terms of labour market policy, which lacks the ability to overcome market-based logics, rather than the solidary basis of health policy.