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Edited by Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori

The second edition of Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy provides entirely new insights into a number of the leading issues surrounding the teaching of entrepreneurship and the building of entrepreneurship programs. Prepared under the auspices of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE), this book features fifteen scholarly perspectives on a range of entrepreneurship education issues.
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Edited by Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori

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Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori

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Edited by Eric W. Liguori and Mark Tonelli

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Edited by Eric W. Liguori and Mark Tonelli

Across the variety of campuses in the CEO network, many chapters have created revenue generating models via student-run ventures. Examples of this include regional conferences, coffee shops, laundering, cleaning, event production, and start-up consultant services. These businesses provide real, actionable experience to the students in the program. We must be relentless in the charge of supporting co-curricular learning models that encourage action. Learning today - by way of participating in a student-run venture, supported by a faculty member, and university infrastructure (this is key) - teaches the interworking’s of new venture creation to students in a way much more powerful than most any classroom lecture or textbook can.

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Eric W. Liguori and Lee Zane

We live in an exciting era for entrepreneurship education, one where entrepreneurship education has become ubiquitous in higher education and is nearing ubiquity in education more broadly. Given entrepreneurial activity is a major determinant of economic development and growth academia has rightfully and logically built programs focusing on the topic. A complementary explanation for entrepreneurship’s proliferation in education is academia’s realization that entrepreneurship is an interdisciplinary topic at its core. This chapter discusses this growth and ubiquity, setting the stage for the value-add inherent in student run ventures.

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Entrepreneurship in Action

The Power of Student-Run Ventures

Edited by Eric W. Liguori and Mark Tonelli

This book offers an in-depth examination of six exemplar student-run ventures. These ventures, actual businesses that students enroll in as a course and run themselves, are changing the ways in which students learn by offering valuable hands-on experience. Many universities around the US have some form of student-run venture operating on campus, but how learning is reinforced and integrated into the classroom varies widely, as does the meaningfulness of the overall student experience. The struggle is most universities operate these ventures as one-offs, disconnected from formal academic instruction and as a side project that never gets full faculty or student attention.
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Eric Liguori, Birton Cowden and Giles Hertz

Those in entrepreneurship, as a discipline, fail to properly equip graduates with the sales acumen necessary for entrepreneurial success. While the critical importance of selling is widely accepted by entrepreneurship educators, it is reasonable to infer that less than 5 percent of entrepreneurship majors are ever exposed to any formal sales training. An Entrepreneurial Sales Skills Bootcamp (SOLD) was established in 2013 to address this deficiency. This chapter explains the nuts and bolts of the SOLD curriculum.

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Edited by Charles H. Matthews and Eric W. Liguori

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Edited by Charles H. Matthews and Eric W. Liguori