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Eric Nauenberg

This chapter applies the life cycle explanation of models by Modigliani (Modigliani and Brumberg, 1980) and by Glaeser et al. (2002) to guide investment in the social services available to people, especially the elderly. Do people invest in their own social capital so that it will be there when needed? The chapter identifies four pathways by which social capital benefits the elderly: providing information; reducing stress; developing personal responsibility; and social groups acting in concert.

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Edited by Sherman Folland and Eric Nauenberg

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Sherman Folland and Eric Nauenberg

The Elgar Companion to Social Capital and Health brings together work from a wide variety of social science disciplines that have been attracted to the promise and the problems of social capital: sociology, political science, economics, epidemiology, psychology, and neurology. Contributors to the Companion come from wide geographic areas of Europe and North America as well as the Middle East. Most of the Companion chapters focus on the theoretical or empirical content of social capital issues. Several, however, will benefit those curious about social capital per se. We believe that a side benefit of this diverse collection is the opportunity to compare different analytical approaches of various disciplines and cultures.

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Edited by Sherman Folland and Eric Nauenberg

Sherman Folland and Eric Nauenberg present the cutting edge of research covering the ever-expanding social capital field. With excellent contributions from leading academics, the Elgar Companion to Social Capital and Health offers a developed examination of new research across sociology, epidemiology, economics, psychology, and political science.