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  • Author or Editor: Erik Poutsma x
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Erik Poutsma

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Erik Poutsma

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Erik Poutsma

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Andrew Pendleton and Erik Poutsma

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Paul E.M. Ligthart, Andrew Pendleton and Erik Poutsma

This chapter questions why legislation has been more forthcoming in some countries than others, given that the availability of fiscal benefits to companies and employees is an extremely important influence on the use of financial participation schemes. The authors discuss the main forms of financial participation, presenting survey evidence on the incidence of financial participation in Europe and further afield. They conclude with a reflection on the reasons for differences between countries in the character and incidence of financial participation. Country profiles of financial participation practices are presented.

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Ina Aust, Michael Muller-Camen and Erik Poutsma

This chapter brings a comparative and institutional perspective to the emergent concept of Sustainable HRM, which links corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human resource management (HRM). Sustainable HRM is defined as the adoption of HRM strategies and practices that enable the achievement of financial, social, and ecological goals, with an impact inside and outside of the organisation and over a long-term time horizon while controlling for unintended side effects and negative feedback. The authors suggest that there may not be a universal version of sustainable HRM, but that different national institutional environments lead to the emergence of different models. Some of these are more conducive to develop sustainability in HRM, whereas others mean that it is more challenging for the HRM function to achieve environmental, social, and human sustainability.