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  • Author or Editor: Eskil Wadensjö x
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Eskil Wadensjö

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Eskil Wadensjö

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Edward Palmer and Eskil Wadensjö

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Susan Niknami, Lena Schröder and Eskil Wadensjö

This chapter asks whether the labour market situation of minority ethnic youth improved or deteriorated during the 2000s, and whether there is evidence that major policy reforms since 2000 made a difference. As a first step toward such knowledge, this chapter analyses how the employment opportunities for minority ethnic youth have developed and how these developments differ between diverse categories of minority ethnic youth in four Nordic countries. The NEET (not in employment, education or training) rates are the highest for the foreign born and lowest for the native born with native-born parents in all countries. The differences are increasing with age, indicating that minority ethnic youth face more obstacles to being included in the labour market than into the school system. Except for Sweden, young women born in a non-Western country are more at risk of being NEET than their male peers.