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Eugene Sadler-Smith

This chapter explores the debates surrounding management as a design science rather than an explanatory science. Taking the mission of design science as being to develop actionable knowledge, the positioning of HRD research is considered and the question asked: can HRD research be considered a design science?

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Vita Akstinaite and Eugene Sadler-Smith

Hubris is an extreme manifestation of confidence and ambition that is characterized by preoccupations with success, feelings of excessive pride and self-importance, arrogance, contempt for advice and criticism, and an imperviousness to learning. It belongs to the same nomological net as overconfidence and hyper core self-evaluation (Haynes et al., 2015) but is distinct from narcissism (Asad and Sadler-Smith, 2020). The origins of hubris research in business and management can be traced back to the foundational work in behavioural finance in the ‘hubris hypothesis’ of mergers and acquisitions (Roll, 1986) which explained the negative consequences of chief executive officer (CEO) overconfidence. Hubris research has branched out subsequently into areas that include strategic management (for example, Hiller and Hambrick, 2005), leadership (for example, Akstinaite et al., 2019) and entrepreneurship (for example, Hayward et al., 2010). Research suggests that hubris is far from uncommon in entrepreneurs (Haynes et al., 2015) and in this chapter we examine the characteristics, causes and consequences, both positive and negative, of entrepreneurial hubris.

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Eugene Sadler-Smith and Tim Wray

This chapter explore the usefulness of abductive reasoning in studying creativity in a Peircean and pragmatic framing. In their argument, the authors draw parallels between deduction, induction and abduction, offering a comparative framework. Their discussion includes the reasoning of Sherlock Holmes and the pragmatism of Charles Sanders Peirce. The chapter ends by exploring the significance of intuition and insight.

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Gerard P. Hodgkinson and Eugene Sadler-Smith

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Lisa A. Burke and Eugene Sadler-Smith

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Marta Sinclair, Eugene Sadler-Smith and Gerard P. Hodgkinson