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Edited by Felia Allum and Stan Gilmour

This multidisciplinary Handbook examines the interactions that develop between organised crime groups and politics across the globe. This exciting original collection highlights the difficulties involved in researching such relationships and shines a new light on how they evolve to become pervasive and destructive. This new Handbook brings together a unique group of international academics from sociology, criminology, political science, anthropology, European and international studies.
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Felia Allum and Stan Gilmour

This chapter analyses how organized crime has been policed within a changing, evolving and overlapping local, national and international environment. After defining the prevailing international norms in the policing of organized crime, the authors discuss how the policy on organized crime has evolved from crime prevention to general securitization. They also deal with the question whether certain national legal approaches have encouraged legal convergence of how organized crime is policed, as attempted within the European Union. Whilst acknowledging the growing seriousness of organized crime, the authors view the concept of organized crime as inherently ambiguous and politically sensitive, resulting in legal complexity. However, the global mobilization against organized crime has culminated in international normative regimes, such as the anti-money laundering framework. International norms like those provided by the United Nations against drugs, trafficking in human beings and financing of terrorism, are being implemented in national contexts and have an impact on everyday policing. Moreover, policing actors are active in direct intervention and capacity building activities within transnational programmes that focus on the control of organized crime

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Felia Allum and David Bright

This chapter presents an overview of the presence of Italian mafias in Australia and compares the very different social and economic behaviours of the ‘Ndrangheta and the Neapolitan Camorra in that country. It considers the interplay of structural factors, contexts and conditions, drivers, facilitators and characteristics which have resulted in the ‘Ndrangheta becoming a territorially and politically rooted mafia in parts of Australia, while Camorra groups use it as a ‘marketplace’ in which to generate profit (exported to Italy) rather than for long-term settlement. On the basis of these case studies, the chapter problematises some of the existing theories on mafia expansions outside their territories of origin.

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Felia Allum, Stan Gilmour and Catherine Hemmings

A man in his thirties with black hair sits behind a desk. He is a former Camorrista who held an important role in his clan because he was one of the clan’s mediators with local politicians. He is unforgiving of politicians: ‘the ambition of all politicians is to “arrive”,without looking anyone in the eye . . . honestly or dishonestly, the important thing is to arrive’ (interview 1, 1997, p. 3). But then, he explains that politicians were often only manipulated by the Mafiosi in their quest for public contracts and funds: the tendering process for public contracts is organised by the local council, the decisions are taken by a board of councillors, the mayor and his deputy; all these people took orders from us. We knew from the start which contract we wanted to win and then, we would approach them through important people, influential people in the town. For example, builders or councillors, individuals who could approach certain people. We would manipulate the tendering process in our favour, indeed . . . we already knew who would win the contract, we knew who would do what, how much and when. (ibid.)

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Felia Allum, Isabella Clough Marinaro and Rocco Sciarrone

The introduction explains the rationale, aims and scope of the book. It provides a brief overview of the existing literature on Italian mafias, explains how it differentiates itself from past works, and offers a chapter-by-chapter outline of the volume.

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Edited by Felia Allum, Isabella Clough Marinaro and Rocco Sciarrone

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Italian Mafias Today

Territory, Business and Politics

Edited by Felia Allum, Isabella Clough Marinaro and Rocco Sciarrone

Despite a rapidly changing economic and legal landscape, Italian mafias remain prominent actors in the global criminal underworld. This book provides an extensive and up-to-date view of how they adapt to shifting economic opportunities and intensifying legal and civic backlash.