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Fiona Ferbrache

Bus rapid transit (BRT)has grown in popularity since the 1970s. It is widely recognized as a key mode of public transit shaping urban spaces in cities across the globe. This chapter provides an introductory context to BRT, its role and effects in urban spaces of which it is a part and considers how BRT has been valued in the broader framework of transport valuation. In particular, different forms of BRT, including buses with a higher level of service, are introduced and conceptualized along a spectrum between BRT lite and BRT full, and between conventional buses and light rail transit. BRT is further conceptualized as an integrative part of urban space, inseparable from the material and immaterial aspects of the spaces in which it develops. It is also argued that BRT ought to be valued beyond the traditional triad of economic, social and environmental effects.

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Fiona Ferbrache

This chapter assesses BRT development in Britain, in which about 12 substantial schemes were in operation by June 2017. These include both guided and unguided busways, all of which are integrated with the local road networks to offer through services. Bus operation as such is generally commercial, with capital investment provided largely by public authorities. Given extensive rail systems in Britain, densities of traffic are relatively low. Encouraging ridership figures and diversion from cars are reported for several schemes. Economic appraisal prior to construction enables anticipated benefit-cost ratios to be identified, and in two cases ex-post ratios may also be calculated from observed data, which are higher than the forecast case. Detailed assessment is provided of the Fastway and South Hampshire cases, and of modal diversion and energy savings arising from the Cambridgeshire case. A tabular outline is also provided of the principal characteristics of other schemes.

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Fiona Ferbrache

Bus rapid transit (BRT) is emphasized as a popular mode of public transit given in-depth analysis in several cities across six continents: Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, Oceania and South America. The value of ‘bottom-up’ grounded analysis is captured as a way of gaining rich insight to the specificity of BRT in particular urban spaces. Beyond this, the way in which BRT has been valued in complex and multifaceted ways is presented relating to social wellbeing, city image, transit-oriented aesthetics, ecology, urban development and environmental effects. This raises broader conceptual questions about the valuation of transport infrastructure investment more generally.

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Developing Bus Rapid Transit

The Value of BRT in Urban Spaces

Edited by Fiona Ferbrache

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a popular mode of sustainable public urban transit given dedicated focus in this timely collection. The effects of BRT are examined in-depth through a range of case studies from cities across six continents, including analysis of BRT planning, implementation, operation, performance and impacts. The contributions from academics and non-academic experts on BRT are framed more broadly within the concept of value and how urban transport investment has and can be valued by and for society.
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Richard D. Knowles and Fiona Ferbrache

This chapter opens the volume on transit oriented development (TOD) and sustainable cities: economics, community and methods, which provides new dimensions and a contemporary focus on sustainable transport, urban development and regeneration across a wide range of countries and levels of development. This chapter introduces TOD and identifies links between transport investment, TOD and sustainability in a historical and contemporary context. The chapter also outlines the book’s contents.

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Richard D. Knowles and Fiona Ferbrache

The concluding chapter synthesizes the book’s new research on transit oriented development (TOD), sustainable transport investment and urban sustainability. It outlines a new agenda for TOD in terms of urban economic sustainability, urban social stability, urban environmental sustainability, urban democracy and political sustainability, and methods to measure TOD and urban sustainability. Based on the preceding empirical research, the chapter emphasizes the importance of a supportive planning and political context for successful TOD.

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Transit Oriented Development and Sustainable Cities

Economics, Community and Methods

Edited by Richard D. Knowles and Fiona Ferbrache

This book provides new dimensions and a contemporary focus on sustainable transport, urban regeneration and development in eight countries spanning four continents at different stages of development. It examines the role of transit oriented development (TOD) in improving urban sustainability and providing different transport choices, exploring how these can be implemented in modern cities.