You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items

  • Author or Editor: Fiona McGaughey x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Fiona McGaughey

During the 30-year conflict in Northern Ireland from 1968–98 (‘the Troubles’), urban landscapes were peppered, some dominated, by murals. These typically gave voice to, and were located in, one of the two conflicting communities – unionist and republican. Also prevalent were other forms of ‘street art’ such as the colouring of paving kerbs in the colours of the British or Irish flag. The images depicted in murals during the Troubles reflected the complex historical and political underpinnings for the conflict. This chapter questions whether the murals might accurately be described as ‘law’, for example due to their normative effect in marking territories. These territories were often associated with specific paramilitary groups and as such, the chapter proposes that the murals were indeed ‘paralaw’. It finds that the murals exacerbated the conflict, that the legal system failed to address the murals and that paramilitaries and communities were largely unhindered in developing the murals. Adopting a legal pluralism perspective, in the context of the Troubles, the murals were not only used to make political statements but were also paralaws – demarcating territory and depicting alternative justice systems. They were a law unto themselves.

This content is available to you

Edited by Jani McCutcheon and Fiona McGaughey

This content is available to you

Edited by Jani McCutcheon and Fiona McGaughey

This content is available to you

Jani McCutcheon and Fiona McGaughey

In a book which investigates the intersections between art and law, we found this quote by Chekhov intriguing. It provoked numerous responses. Surely artists – and art – can indeed, answer questions? Even while art asks questions, it usually provides some clues to how we might respond. In curating this book, we spent much time contemplating what art does, and what law does, and more importantly what they do and can do for each other. And we were struck by the sheer number and variety of questions that circulate in the chapters of this book. Questions by, about, and of both art and law, and the society and culture they help to form, and which shape them. Both art and law pose, and we would suggest, answer questions. We are particularly interested in the reciprocal questioning and answering that can occur between art and law, and we sought in this book to harness and reveal that dynamic. This book responds to an increasing interest in the connections between visual art and law, and aims to foster a multi-faceted, international and interdisciplinary dialogue between these two fascinating territories. Traditional approaches to the interface between law and art have tended to focus on substantive areas of law that most directly deal with art, such as copyright and cultural heritage law. Or, they take a generalist area of law and target its specific application to art, such as art and freedom of expression. Sometimes they examine the interface between the law and particular genres of art, such as graffiti, or art in particular legal contexts, such as famous art trials. There is other scholarship engaging generally with the very broad topic of ‘Art and the Law’, however this tends to be jurisdiction-specific, and functions more as descriptions of the numerous laws with potential application to art, and as guides for practitioners or artists.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Jani McCutcheon and Fiona McGaughey

Featuring international contributions from leading and emerging scholars, this innovative Research Handbook presents a panoramic view of how law sees visual art, and how visual art sees law. It resists the conventional approach to art and law as inherently dissonant – one a discipline preoccupied with rationality, certainty and objectivity; the other a creative enterprise ensconced in the imaginary and inviting multiple, unique and subjective interpretations. Blending these two distinct disciplines, this unique Research Handbook bridges the gap between art and law.