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Amélie Jacquemin and Frank Janssen

This chapter investigates to what extent the legal environment might have a positive impact on entrepreneurship. Using a research design combining quantitative and qualitative approaches, the authors aim at understanding who the entrepreneurs are who positively use regulation as a source of business opportunity, and how they succeed in this. Not all entrepreneurs use regulation as a source of opportunity, and those who do use two approaches, which the authors call ‘Kirznerian’ and ‘Schumpeterian’ approaches.

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Ngo Vi Dung and Frank Janssen

Ngo Vi Dung and Frank Janssen examine whether the market-supporting institutions at the sub-national level influence the export behaviors of firms in the context of an emerging economy, namely Vietnam. Analysing a dataset of 7818 Vietnamese firms, including 719 exporting firms, they find that export propensity is mainly and negatively influenced by provincial financial conditions. Provincial attitudes, bureaucracy, and legal and informal charges positively drive the firm’s export intensity. The predictability of domestic laws and regulations negatively influences the firm’s export intensity. In addition, institutions do matter more for smaller, younger and private firms. Nevertheless, the influence of sub-national market-supporting institutions on export mode choice is ambiguous.

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Amélie Jacquemin and Frank Janssen

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Frank Janssen, Valérie Eeckhout and Benoît Gailly

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Frank Janssen, Valérie Eeckhout and Benoît Gailly

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Amélie Wuillaume, Amélie Jacquemin and Frank Janssen

This chapter develops and tests a set of hypotheses concerning how the tone of entrepreneurial narratives affects funding success. The authors first test their propositions on a sample of projects seeking resources on a donation and reward-based crowdfunding platform (Ulule). Their results suggest that money providers on such a platform prefer narratives characterized by a relatively high emotional language. Results also indicate that the community (social) sense displayed has a particularly high influence and even dominates the influence of the emotional tone. The authors also examine the influence of the same variables on a lending- and equity-based platforms (MyMicroInvest). The results indicate that funding success is enhanced by a cognitive tone and that the sense of community stays an indicator of success. Backers on donation- and reward-based platforms seem to be motivated by the emotional dimension while funders on lending- and equity-based platform seem to be guided by cognitive considerations.