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Frank Moulaert

Starting from the history of thought and practice of innovation, Frank Moulaert muses on the trajectories of meanings and theorization of this concept. He uses this history as a mirror to reflect on the relationship between innovation and development and explains how originally, say starting in the eighteenth century, the term innovation basically referred to social innovation and to debates and struggles to change the world. But with the rise of modernity and the strong appeal of science and technology to policy makers and other societal and economic leaders, the concept of innovation lost its essentially social meaning. As of the 1930s, innovation has been predominantly referred to as technological innovation, connecting it preferably to economic innovation. This reduction of the meaning of innovation has had an impact on the way development was conceived and materialized, especially at the expense of visions and strategies of development from below.

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Holistic research methodology and pragmatic collective action

Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research

Frank Moulaert and Abid Mehmood

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Framing social innovation research: a sociology of knowledge perspective

Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research

Frank Moulaert and Barbara Van Dyck

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Frank Moulaert and Abid Mehmood

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Social innovation: intuition, precept, concept, theory and practice

Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research

Frank Moulaert, Diana MacCallum and Jean Hillier

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General introduction: the return of social innovation as a scientific concept and a social practice

Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research

Frank Moulaert, Diana MacCallum, Abid Mehmood and Abdelillah Hamdouch

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Social innovation research: a new stage in innovation analysis?

Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research

Bob Jessop, Frank Moulaert, Lars Hulgård and Abdelillah Hamdouch

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The International Handbook on Social Innovation

Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research

Edited by Frank Moulaert, Diana MacCallum, Abid Mehmood and Abdelillah Hamdouch

The contributors provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, methodologies and instructive experiences from all continents, as well as implications for collective action and policy. They argue strongly for social innovation as a key to human development. The Handbook defines social innovation as innovation in social relations within both micro and macro spheres, with the purpose of satisfying unmet or new human needs across different layers of society. It connects social innovation to empowerment dynamics, thus giving a political character to social movements and bottom-up governance initiatives. Together these should lay the foundations for a fairer, more democratic society for all.
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Pieter Van den Broeck, Asiya Sadiq, Ide Hiergens, Monica Quintana Molina, Han Verschure and Frank Moulaert

Questions of land tenure, security and access to land, are major concerns of citizens and migrants in most cities of the world. Neo-liberal urban policies have contributed to land tenure and land market transformation, land speculation, confiscation of public space, rise of land values and gentrification in inner cities. This has caused lack of tenure rights, exclusion from appropriate and affordable urban services, eviction and displacement, intra-urban migration and expansion of urban peripheries. Various land-based socially innovative initiatives are, however, responding by (re)conceptualising measures such as land sharing, community land trusts, starter titles and land readjustment, among others, to facilitate sharing of space under conditions of (sub)urban land transformation. This book seeks to generate state-of-the-art knowledge on collective action and policy in the area of land tenure and (sub)urban development. This introductory chapter explains this aim, situates the book within recent literature on land tenure dynamics, elaborates a governance perspective to assess these dynamics, and introduces the book’s chapters. It argues that as a key pillar of community development, dynamics and conditions of land tenure systems need to be well understood to formulate more appropriate development alternatives and governance systems attuned to the interests of the urban society as a whole, and the needs of the poor and the vulnerable citizens and migrants in particular. The book includes five conceptual chapters and covers 12 cases in nine countries in four continents (Pakistan, Peru, Brazil, Ghana, India, Ecuador, Mexico, Japan, Belgium), documenting commoning and social innovation initiatives and movements, responding to enclosure, privatisation, speculation and land trafficking. As such, the book fundamentally questions decennia-old relations between the private market sector, the state and civil society.