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G. Daniel and M. Arce

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Daniel G. Arce M.

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V. Kerry Smith and Daniel G. Hallstrom

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Patrick Horsman, Daniel G. Gallagher and E. Kevin Kelloway

The nature and extent of members’ commitment to their labor union has been a topic of research interest for approximately 75 years. Although the rationale for studying member commitment has varied across the years, union commitment has emerged as a central variable in understanding union_member relations and, by extension, the process of unionization. The purpose of this chapter is to: (1) provide a brief review of the history and development of the construct of union commitment; (2) examine the current state of knowledge regarding the predictors, consequences, and correlates of union commitment; and (3) to re-evaluate the operational measures of union commitment and offer the outline of a research agenda that is intended to reinvigorate the study of union commitment.

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J.Daniel Hammond, Steven G. Medema and John D. Singleton

This comprehensive research review brings together the most important papers from leading economists published in the past 120 years covering a wide range of topics and issues.
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J.Daniel Hammond, Steven G. Medema and John D. Singleton

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J. Daniel Hammond, Steven G. Medema and John D. Singleton

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J.Daniel Hammond, Steven G. Medema and John D. Singleton

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Lucinda A. Low, James G. Tillen, Karl Abendschein and Daniel M. Fisher-Owens

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Steven B. Caudill, Daniel M. Gropper, Valentina Hartarska and Franklin G. Mixon

There have been numerous studies examining the relationship between economic freedom and economic growth. At the same time, there have been relatively few studies examining production or cost relationships for microfinance institutions, largely due to the lack of adequate data. The goal of this chapter is to combine these two strands of literature. In particular, we examine the impact of improvements in economic freedom on microfinance efficiency for microfinance institutions in Europe and Central Asia using a translog cost function. We find that increased microfinance efficiency is associated with improvements in economic freedom and that those countries experiencing large changes in economic freedom experience significant improvements in microfinance efficiency.