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Gary Warnaby and Dominic Medway

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Dominic Medway and Gary Warnaby

The multisensory manner in which human beings engage and interact with places is well evidenced in literary sources such as travel diaries. It is also something a number of geographers, anthropologists and tourism scholars have long understood. This chapter discusses the implications of multisensory interaction with places for place branding and marketing. First, we briefly consider the relative absence of a consideration of the senses in the place branding literature and examine why this might be. Second, we propose a manifesto for multisensory place branding research, emphasizing why it is important and how it could be operationalized. In concluding, we project into the future and think about how multisensory place branding could fundamentally challenge our understanding of how places and destinations are represented as branded entities.

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Gary Warnaby and Christopher J. Parker

The aim of this chapter is to explore how the ability to move with ease around an urban locale affects a user’s experience of that place, and the extent to which this may be capitalized upon for place marketing/branding purposes. We begin by outlining different aspects of mobility outlined by Tim Cresswell and, drawing on work by Michel de Certeau, explore the potential implications for place marketing/branding with particular reference to walking (and the related aspect of accessibility). Emphasizing the performative aspects of walking, we utilize some current trends in marketing theory (i.e. the service-dominant logic of marketing and a more experiential perspective on marketing) to consider how mobility – both in reality and virtually – might be appropriated for the purposes of place marketing/branding, and the processes by which these activities are planned and implemented.

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Gary Warnaby and Dominic Medway

This chapter considers the visual and aesthetic impact of vacant retail and commercial space (which may be in various states of disrepair) on perceptions of urban centres, and the consequent implications for place marketing/branding activity. We begin by examining the current fascination with ruination (manifest in the concept of ‘ruin porn’), moving to discuss the various ways in which the urban retail and commercial landscape can be read in visual terms and the manner in which this may be influenced by ruination. We consider how vacant retail and commercial space can be treated by those responsible for the management, marketing and branding of urban places, to mitigate the negative aesthetic effect of empty space, concluding with an identification of future avenues for research.

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Kathryn Swanson, Dominic Medway and Gary Warnaby

This chapter examines the idea of brand love in relation to tourism destinations. Through the reporting of a study based in three destinations in the United States (Orlando, Florida; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Las Vegas, Nevada), the chapter demonstrates how brand love is manifest for destination products among tourists. The chapter concludes with the development of a brand love model for destinations, arguably relevant for both academia and practice. Additionally, the research data indicate that tourists get distinct benefits out of relationships with different destinations, and this leads to the identification of three types of destination brand love related to three Greek words for ‘love’: philia (friendship type of love), storge (affection type of love) and eros (passionate type of love).

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Gary Warnaby, David Bennison and Dominic Medway