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Gerhard Bosch

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Gerhard Bosch

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Gerhard Bosch

Income inequality in Germany increased dramatically owing to the erosion of its wage-setting system, which had followed the inclusive model until the mid-1990s. Nevertheless, social dialogue continued to play a central role in Germany, becoming even more important in recent times. A milestone was reached in revitalising the social dialogue, encouraged by the universal ability to deal with the financial crisis through innovative working time models and the establishment of more than half a million apprenticeships during the crisis, preventing a rise in youth unemployment. The handling of the crisis through dialogue left an impression on the social partners who were all proud to have navigated the crisis successfully. It certainly improved the cooperation between employers’ associations and social partners, and is perhaps the blueprint to follow in the next crisis. Also, the new minimum wage successfully set a low-wage threshold to help stem the competitiveness of some companies to lower wages.

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Gerhard Bosch

Income inequality in Germany increased dramatically owing to the erosion of its wage-setting system, which had followed the inclusive model until the mid-1990s. Nevertheless, social dialogue continued to play a central role in Germany, becoming even more important in recent times. A milestone was reached in revitalising the social dialogue, encouraged by the universal ability to deal with the financial crisis through innovative working time models and the establishment of more than half a million apprenticeships during the crisis, preventing a rise in youth unemployment. The handling of the crisis through dialogue left an impression on the social partners who were all proud to have navigated the crisis successfully. It certainly improved the cooperation between employers’ associations and social partners, and is perhaps the blueprint to follow in the next crisis. Also, the new minimum wage successfully set a low-wage threshold to help stem the competitiveness of some companies to lower wages.

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Gerhard Bosch and Thorsten Kalina

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Gerhard Bosch and Thorsten Kalina

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Gerhard Bosch and Andreas Jansen

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Edited by Dominique Anxo, Gerhard Bosch and Jill Rubery

This timely book reveals that new life courses are found to require more, and not less welfare support, but only Sweden has developed an active life course approach and only three more could be considered supportive, in at least some life stages. For the remainder, policies were at best limited or, in Italy’s case, passive. The contributors reveal that the neglect of changing needs is leading to greater reliance on the family and the labour market, just as these support structures are becoming more unpredictable and more unequal. They argue that alongside these new class inequalities, new forms of inter-generational inequality are also emerging, particularly in pension provision.
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Dominique Anxo, Gerhard Bosch and Jill Rubery