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Kenneth Moore, Hamish Coates and Gwilym Croucher

Higher education has grown to play a major role in many countries, amplifying interest in productivity. Yet surprisingly little scholarly research has been conducted on this phenomenon. The chapter discusses the generalisation of a model validated previously by the United States National Academy of Science. It exemplifies this model by analysing cross-national data collected from ten diverse Asian countries and dozens of institutions. Quantitative data was collected on inputs, and on education and research outputs. In each country reviews were conducted of salient political and institutional contexts. The chapter reviews technical and empirical contributions to research, and articulates contexts and strategies for improving national policy and institutional management. Most broadly, it highlights the value of progressing contextualised scientific studies of productivity in higher education.

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Victor Borden, Hamish Coates and Robert Bringle

The tertiary and higher education landscape includes a diverse array of institutions and organizations that pursue both common and distinct mission objectives. The diversification of providers and formats for provision follows closely the increased demands on the sector to serve a broader array of societal and individual needs within the ‘global knowledge economy’. Several classification and typology schemes assist in crafting policy and accountability schemes that accommodate mission diversity into the assessment of institutional performance. In contrast, rankings and league tables represent reductionist efforts that compare a narrow range of institutions according to inflexible, uniform criteria, regardless of mission. This chapter examines the extent to which classification schemes and emerging reporting initiatives pertaining to an array of outcome measures have contributed toward multifaceted approaches to assessing institutional performance and quality and have mitigated the influence of reductionist rankings.

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Edited by Brendan Cantwell, Hamish Coates and Roger King

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Brendan Cantwell, Hamish Coates and Roger King

This chapter introduces this Handbook on the Politics of Higher Education. It starts by advancing ideas and frames to position the following chapters, and then considers broad rationales for the book. The chapter closes by surveying the Handbook’s five parts, and providing a brief overview of the 28 chapters that follow.

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Edited by Brendan Cantwell, Hamish Coates and Roger King

Understanding the politics of Higher Education is becoming more important as the sector is increasingly recognised as a vital source of innovation, skills, economic prosperity, and personal wellbeing. Yet key political differences remain over such issues as who should pay for higher education, how should it be accountable, and how we measure its quality and productivity. Particularly, are states or markets the key in helping to address such matters. The Handbook provides framing perspectives and perspectives, chapters on funding, governance and regulation, and pieces on the political economy of higher education and on the increased role of external stakeholders and indicators.
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Ellen Hazelkorn, Hamish Coates and Alexander C. McCormick

This chapter puts the discussion of the book’s theme – quality, performance and accountability – into context, and introduces the ideas, structure and contributions of this book. It explores the book’s rationales and the three framing ideas. Next, it surveys the five parts of the book, and its 42 chapters that follow. The chapter concludes with suggestions for future progress in this field.

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Edited by Ellen Hazelkorn, Hamish Coates and Alexander C. McCormick

As higher education becomes a key determinant for economic competitiveness, institutions face increasing pressure to demonstrate their fitness to meet the needs of society and individuals. Blending innovative research with richly contextualised examples this unique Research Handbook provides authoritative insights from around the globe on how best to understand, assess and improve quality, performance and accountability in higher education.
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Edited by Ellen Hazelkorn, Hamish Coates and Alexander C. McCormick

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Hamish Coates, S. Umesha Weerakkody, Emeline Jerez, Michael Wells and Stefan Popenici

People seek to engage in higher education in ways that will help them to succeed. This means that they need to know what opportunities are available for them, and that education services align with and realize their ambitions. In turn, this means that relevant and sound reports of information about higher education are emerging as a lynchpin for success. This chapter examines how the changing political economy of higher education is shaping new approaches to quality and placing greater value than ever before on student success. It analyses changing supply and demand dynamics, which spur the need for new kinds of reports. It closes by looking at prospects for guiding the required innovation.