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Harri Kalimo, Kaisa Olkkonen and Jari Vaario

Chapter 11 of the book offers insights into European intellectual property rights policies. Kaisa Olkkonen and Jari Vaario, senior corporate figures with years of first hand experience on IPRs, with Harri Kalimo, Professor at the Institute for European Studies (IES) at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, offer three fundamental examples from the area: standard essential patents (SEPs), copyright licensing for content online and copyright levies for digital copies. The Chapter’s conclusions are somewhat negative, however: the authors assess that during Barroso II Commission, the development of the EU’s IPR policies seems to have been sluggish, and in parts even counter-productive from the perspective of Europe’s commercial interests. The crisis has given the Commission only limited leverage in persuading the Member States to push the digital agenda. The Member States seem to have become even more defensive. While the Commission may have managed to put some of the issues on the agenda, the time it took to do this entails a heavy penalty on the European market players and consumers. In the area of copyright licensing, the delay has also meant a non-economic loss on cultural diversity. Much work remains to be completed by the Juncker Commission, and constitutionally speaking the slow process at EU level has in some cases moved the frontier of policy developments to the national level.
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Edited by Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

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Edited by Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

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Edited by Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

The authors to this edited volume combine expertise of a cross-cutting nature. Insider insights to the activities of the Barroso II Commission are first of all offered by leading in-house experts from Commission Directorate-Generals in charge of the analysed fields: Economic and Financial Affairs (Lahti), the Internal Market (Faull) and Public Procurement (Hoffmeister). This expertise is complemented in tax issues by a specialist from the EU’s co-legislator, the Council of the EU (Strub). Public sector expertise is mixed with selected private sector perspectives in areas crucial to the European companies and their competitiveness – procurement (Meulenbelt, law practitioner), value-added taxation (Lejeune, consultant) and Intellectual Property Rights (Olkkonen and Vaario, corporate). Finally, the insiders’ perspectives are complemented by external observations from the media (Strupczewski from Reuters) and academia (Geiger, Jansson, Kalimo and Salminen).
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Edited by Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

This book seeks to contribute to the debate about the EU’s economic crisis by analysing how it affected the development of economic law in the Union during the Barroso II Commission. The areas of EU economic law analysed in this book cover the EMU and the internal market, and particular attention is paid to the fields of public procurement, taxation and intellectual property rights. As cornerstones to Europe 2020 strategy, the latter three fields seem crucial to finding a way out of the crisis. The developments in the noted fields of law are scrutinized from four cross-cutting perspectives: harmonization, institutions, non-economic values and international actions. Kalimo and Jansson find the variances in how the areas of economic law have developed noteworthy, because the core of the crisis has gradually extended towards the real economy; growth, competitiveness and investments. The book’s conclusion is that during the crisis the attention of the Barroso Commission has focused too narrowly on selected urgent problems, failing to spark off bold policy endeavours and to break inter-institutional blockades and interest captures on fundamental longer-term issues. An important part of the challenge remains the appropriate integration of social considerations into the measures. So while certainly not wasted, the crisis has not been optimally exploited for the development of EU economic law, either.
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Edited by Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

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Edited by Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

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Edited by Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

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Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

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Harri Kalimo and Max S. Jansson

In the concluding Chapter 12, the editors to this volume, Harri Kalimo and researcher Max S. Jansson, also from the IES (VUB)) add a final layer of analysis on the basis of the area-specific enquiries of the preceding Chapters. The conclusions are framed against the book’s four, interwoven themes: they provide insights on the differences and commonalities in the areas of law in terms of the policy changes and integration, changes in the institutional landscape, the prevalence of non-economic considerations, as well as the international position of the European Union. The analysis reveals that a large part of the achievements of the crisis have indeed been about completing the EMU and the internal market for financial services, where actions were also most urgently needed. Kalimo and Jansson find the differences across the fields of economic law noteworthy, because the core of the crisis has gradually shifted towards the real economy; growth, competitiveness and investments. This calls for the Juncker Commission to focus on public procurement and intellectual property rights, which are essential in supporting progress on all three fronts. Across all the studied fields, Kalimo and Jansson conclude that the means of integration are more and more differentiated, while policy developments are becoming increasingly entangled with constitutional questions.