You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items

  • Author or Editor: Henning Lohmann x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Henning Lohmann

With the growing body of research on the working poor, a broader discussion of concepts and measurement has evolved. In-work poverty is a hybrid concept which – in contrast to concepts such as low wage work – combines the labour market position of an individual with a poverty perspective focusing on the living standard at the household level. Defining and measuring in-work poverty requires answers to two questions: ‘Who is a worker?’ and ‘What is poverty?’. The chapter discusses both and provides an in-depth discussion of measurement approaches, in particular those developed by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Eurostat and the International Labour Organization (ILO). Furthermore, it shows empirically how the incidence and structure (for example, by gender) of in-work poverty differ according to measurement approach.

This content is available to you

Edited by Hans-Jürgen Andreß and Henning Lohmann

This content is available to you

Hans-Jürgen Andreß and Henning Lohmann

You do not have access to this content

Henning Lohmann and Ive Marx

You do not have access to this content

Henning Lohmann and Hans-Jürgen Andreß

You do not have access to this content

The Working Poor in Europe

Employment, Poverty and Globalization

Edited by Hans-Jürgen Andreß and Henning Lohmann

For a long time in-work poverty was not associated with European welfare states. Recently, the topic has gained relevance as welfare state retrenchment and international competition in globalized economies has put increasing pressures on individuals and families. This book provides explanations as to why in-work poverty is high in certain countries and low in others.
This content is available to you

Henning Lohmann and Ive Marx

You do not have access to this content

Henning Lohmann and Eric Crettaz

The in-work poverty risk differs within and across countries. In this chapter the authors focus on explanations of in-work poverty in and across rich countries, in particular in Europe. Combining earlier proposals they develop a model for the explanation of the incidence and structure of in-work poverty taking into account economic and institutional characteristics as well as individual and household-related factors. They provide a systematic comparative overview on previous research and single out commonly addressed topics and research gaps. Adding to the recent body of literature, they carry out a multilevel analysis based on the 2013 wave of the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC). The analysis shows that in-work poverty is the result of a complex interplay between individual and household earnings, household needs and the availability of transfers.