You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items

  • Author or Editor: Jakob Lauring x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Jakob Lauring and Charlotte Jonasson

Based on our experience this chapter provides some advice on how to collect multimethod qualitative data using a fieldwork approach. In particular, we focus on experience in relation to what has often been termed the iterative or circular research process. This involves generating field relevant research questions, collecting the data, logging the data, analyzing the data, writing it up, and then returning to reconsider the research questions in order to continue the data collection process. We focus on intercultural challenges in fieldwork and discuss how to gain an insider’s perspective on social activities in organizations. We also outline specific techniques for collecting data and provide practical guidelines.

This content is available to you

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

This content is available to you

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

This content is available to you

David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

The Field Guide to Intercultural Research, published by the internationally renowned publisher, Edward Elgar Publishing, invites readers to follow 48 authors into their research fields in nearly 20 different countries across the African, Asian, Australian, European and Middle Eastern regions. In 26 chapters, in addition to both a preface and an afterword, the authors who are representing more than 20 nationalities, narrate their experiences with solving intercultural challenges encountered during fieldwork - predominantly overseas but also in the home country.

You do not have access to this content

Charlotte Jonasson, Jakob Lauring and David S. A. Guttormsen

This chapter concerns the importance of race for the complex negotiation of researcher roles and relations to the participants in intercultural fieldwork. Based on the authors’ own experience, we propose that more attention to race is needed because physical first impressions may have consequences for researcher ‘insider-outsiderness’ for gaining access to and conducting fieldwork. Furthermore, we argue that in comparison with other categories such as language or culture, racial appearance is perceived as a rather fixed, ‘taken for granted’ category by which researchers and participants can be distinguished.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

You do not have access to this content

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

This informative Field Guide to Intercultural Research is specifically designed to be used in the field, guiding the reader away from pitfalls and towards best practice. It shares valuable fieldwork challenges and experiences, as well as insights into key methodological debates and practical recommendations relevant to both new and seasoned researchers.
You do not have access to this content

Jan Selmer, Jodie-Lee Trembath and Jakob Lauring

Expatriate academics make up a rapidly growing professional group that is driven by the emergence of an international academic labor market, international staff mobility, and growing numbers of international students. Hence, academics often relocate for job reasons. A reason for that is that they can be characterized by having a high non-organization-specific capital, which makes them particularly mobile in the international labour market. Most research of expatriates has up to now focused on business expatriates. Recently, however, a number of studies of expatriate academics have been published. Such studies are needed since there is evidence that universities are investing a great amount of resources in hiring and retaining international academic staff. It can be argued that the increasing numbers of expatriate academics could make human resource management in universities more problematic, as they present growing challenges for academic institutions since expatriate academics may in some aspects function differently from their local counterparts and also from other types of expatriates. Therefore, it is important to acquire knowledge of this under-researched professional group – not the least since this group contributes highly to the productivity of the university sector. Besides definitions of expatriate academics and their detailed descriptions, this chapter also features their work engagement, adjustment, work-related outcomes and reasons to relocate, as well as a research agenda on future research on expatriate academics.

You do not have access to this content

Kristiina Mäkelä, Jakob Lauring, Christina L. Butler, Hyun-Jung Lee, Gundula Lücke, Christof Miska, Cecilia Pahlberg and Günter K. Stahl

In this chapter we suggest that globalization of businesses brings with it three new challenges that teams need to face. These include an increase in the number of internal and external stakeholders to manage; the need to interact across more and different types of boundaries; and an increasing necessity to integrate local responsiveness and global coordination. We focus on how these new globalization challenges impact teams in general and team leadership in particular, and how team leaders can make a difference by developing specific capabilities to address them.