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Jan Fagerberg

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Jan Fagerberg

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Jan Fagerberg

During the last two decades we have seen a revival of interest in the works of Joseph Schumpeter and "evolutionary" ideas in economics more generally. A professional society honouring Schumpeter's name has been founded, and linked to it we have had for more than fifteen years now a professional journal devoted to this stream of thought. However, it has been argued that, despite these recent developments, the link between Schumpeter's own work and the more recent contributions to evolntionary economics is in fact rather weak. This paper considers this claim.

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Jan Fagerberg

Innovation policy has emerged as a new field of economic policy during the last few decades. This paper explores the rationales for national innovation policies, as laid out in the existing literature on the subject, and considers what the lessons and challenges for theory and practice in this area are.

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Jan Fagerberg

The relationship between the economic structure of a country and its productivity growth has received a lot of attention in recent decades. For instance, several theoretical models in this area now suggest that countries that specialize in technologically progressive industries will enjoy high rates of growth compared to other countries. This paper focuses on the impact of specialization and structural changes on productivity growth in manufacturing, using a sample of 39 countries and 24 industries between 1973 and 1990.

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Jan Fagerberg

The Nordic countries are among the richest in Europe and globally. They are known for having a more equal distribution of income than elsewhere, for highly organized, regulated and inclusive labor markets, for universal welfare states and for well-developed and free education systems.

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Jan Fagerberg

This authoritative and enlightening book focuses on fundamental questions such as what is innovation, who is it relevant for, what are the effects, and what is the role of (innovation) policy in supporting innovation-diffusion? The first two sections present a comprehensive overview of our current knowledge on the phenomenon and analyse how this knowledge (and the scholarly community underpinning it) has evolved towards its present state. The third part explores the role of innovation for growth and development, while section four is concerned with the national innovation system and the role of (innovation) policy in influencing its dynamics and responding to the important challenges facing contemporary societies.
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Jan Fagerberg and David C. Mowery

Several attempts have been made since the 1970s to collect key scholarly papers and document the progress of the field of innovation studies. This discussion of papers, most of which were published after the turn of the millennium, stands on the shoulders of this earlier work and seeks to provide a broad overview of recent progress in research on innovation and economic change. In their choice of papers, the authors address the characteristics of the field of innovation studies and its relationship to other areas of (social) science: innovation in firms; factors influencing firms’ innovation performance; innovation systems; innovation and economic ‘catch-up’ and, finally, policy issues for innovation.