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Jane Millar

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Jane Millar

Family obligations can be defined and understood in different ways: as moral obligations (what we believe it is right to do in a particular situation); as everyday life in practice (how family members support and care for each other); and as external requirements (how law and public policy define the rights and duties of family members to each other). This chapter by Millar explores how family obligations have been considered in family policy research, in particular in relation to parenting and care of the elderly. Millar reviews research on the extent to which family policy acts to complement or to crowd out family solidarity. This suggests that there is a complementarity between family and state support but also that the nature and level of state support does have important implications for family, and especially for women. Millar also reviews research on the experience of receiving family support, particularly for people in poverty, where the values of reciprocity, autonomy and privacy may come under challenge. The implications of expecting families with limited resources to provide for family members can put a heavy strain on family relationships and lead to less, not more, family solidarity.

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Jane Millar, Sue Middleton and Jane Millar

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Edited by Eleni Apospori and Jane Millar

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The Dynamics of Social Exclusion in Europe

Comparing Austria, Germany, Greece, Portugal and the UK

Edited by Eleni Apospori and Jane Millar

Issues of poverty and social exclusion are high on the European policy agenda. The Dynamics of Social Exclusion in Europe reports findings from a study funded by the European Commission, using data from the European Community Household Panel, with a multi-dimensional approach to international comparisons of poverty and social exclusion. The research, building upon that of the preceding book – Poverty and Social Exclusion in Europe – compares four groups who are anticipated to be at particular risk of poverty and social exclusion; young adults, lone parents, the sick or disabled, and those retired from employment.
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Sue Middleton, Matt Barnes and Jane Millar

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Matt Barnes, Christopher Heady, Sue Middleton, Jane Millar, Fotis Papadopoulos, Graham Room and Panos Tsakloglou

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Matt Barnes, Christopher Heady, Sue Middleton, Jane Millar, Fotis Papadopoulos, Graham Room and Panos Tsakloglou

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Matt Barnes, Christopher Heady, Sue Middleton, Jane Millar, Fotis Papadopoulos, Graham Room and Panos Tsakloglou

There are estimated to be almost 60 million people living in poverty throughout the European Union. This bleak statistic underlines the value of this important book which explores the nature and extent of poverty and social exclusion in six European countries, namely: Austria, Germany, Greece, Norway, Portugal and the UK. The book focuses on four ‘life course’ groups who might be considered particularly at risk: young adults, lone parents, the sick and disabled, and the retired.