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John Brazier and Jennifer Roberts

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Recruitment, Retention and Retirement in Higher Education

Building and Managing the Faculty of the Future

Edited by Robert L. Clark and Jennifer Ma

This volume examines some of the most pressing employment and compensation issues confronting academic administrators. Contributors discuss topics such as: ageing of faculty, changing economic conditions and shifts in faculty employment patterns, rapid increases in health care costs and trends in retiree health insurance, and adoption of phased and early retirement programs.
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Robert Tannenwald, Jennifer Weiner and Igor Popov

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Robert A. LaFave and Jennifer L. Dunn

Policy makers and scientists play critical roles in environmental governance. Partnerships between these two groups have been identified as offering beneficial solutions to environmental management problems, yet these groups often talk past each other. This is an important issue because transdisciplinary research groups must incorporate policy actors to create greater change. This chapter looks at the intersection between complex environmental problems, policymakers, scientists and solutions. The term “policymakers” is defined and interactions between researchers and policy actors are showcased within the framework of the Clean Water Act. Barriers to effective research teamwork that includes policy makers and scientists, including professional, institutional and political barriers, are discussed to help gain an understanding of why collaborations between policy makers and scientists sometimes fail, but also how they can succeed. A key element of successful collaboration between policy makers and scientists is engagement, specifically early engagement, which can overcome organizational constraints and increase trust between group members.

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John Brazier, Jennifer Roberts and Donna Rowen

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KimMarie McGoldrick, Robert Rebelein, Jennifer K. Rhoads and Sue Stockly

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Jennifer L. Dunn, Jessie L. Knowlton, Robert M. Handler, Erin C. Pischke, Kathleen E. Halvorsen, M. Azahara Mesa-Jurado, Theresa L. Selfa, David J. Flaspohler, Julian Licata, Ena E. Mata-Zayas, Rodrigo Medeiros, Cassandra Moseley, Erik A. Nielsen, Valentin D. Picasso Risso, Julio C. Sacramento-Rivero, Tatiana de Souza, Cesar J. Vazquez Navarette and Nathan Basiliko

A transdisciplinary group of scientists and industrial, governmental and non-governmental organization partners collaborated to study the sustainability of bioenergy development across the Americas. The research focused on understanding the socioecological impacts of bioenergy in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, Uruguay and the US. This chapter reports on how the group was formed through a smaller group that recognized the value of an interdisciplinary approach to studying environmental problems. We discuss the barriers and strategies the team faced when conducting transdisciplinary research and how environmental researchers and scientists can use this knowledge to anticipate challenges associated with transdisciplinary, international research. Lastly, we demonstrate the importance of recognizing environmental management issues as socioecological problems and show that studying them requires transdisciplinary teamwork.