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Jim Stewart

Based on experience as an academic providing research supervision for over 30 years, this chapter analyses what the author considers to be significant changes in that aspect of academic work. The chapter examines the experiences of research supervision in the past, compares those to the present and uses the comparison to speculate on future changes. As part of the examination, various contexts of supervision as well as principles of good practice are suggested. In addition, the chapter argues that the changing nature of higher education institutions from places that once valued academic freedom into risk averse and managerialist organisations, has been and will continue to be the greatest influence on how research supervision is provided to students.

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Jim Stewart

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Jim Stewart

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Jim Stewart

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Jim Stewart

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Jim Stewart

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Jim Stewart and Victoria Harte

Online surveys are complex, with many factors affecting rates of response. Reasons for non-response are argued here to fall into three main categories: questionnaire design, personal motivation of respondents and distribution methods. The last category is particularly significant in relation to the assumed online preference of Generation X and Y.

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Marilena Antoniadou, Mark Crowder and Jim Stewart

This chapter explores key roles and responsibilities undertaken by academics working in UK Higher Education in relation to the student experience. Based on a case study of a large, modern university, we explore perceptions of three management roles that academics perform alongside their academic duties; namely programme leader, year tutor and personal tutor. Drawing on Brookfield’s (1995) four-lens framework, these roles are examined from multiple actors’ perspectives: students, peers, educational researchers, and autobiographical experiences. This study makes an important theoretical contribution by applying Brookfield’s four-lens framework, not previously used in researching academic life. Doing this offers insight into how each management role is enacted, and how it relates to various aspects of the student experience. These unique theoretical and empirical insights have implications for enhancing the student experience and supporting academics in the enactment of management roles.