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Jimmy Donaghey

Choosing the topic of a doctoral thesis is a significant part of the journey towards a PhD. Much depends on the type of pathway the student is taking. This chapter focuses on the key issues with regard to identifying a potential topic. For example, the topic should be capable of generating lessons to advance what is already known in theoretical, empirical or methodological terms, and it should garner interest from the wider academic community. Three separate yet related areas for the student to consider when choosing and developing the research project are discussed, and the importance of selecting an area of interest is noted. Additionally, guidelines are set out concerning changing the topic of the thesis, if this becomes necessary during the PhD journey.

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Jimmy Donaghey

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Niall Cullinane and Jimmy Donaghey

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Niall Cullinane and Jimmy Donaghey

This chapter provides a critical review of the literature on the phenomenon of employees who do not speak out: employee silence. It highlights that work in the area to date has been dominated scholars from an organizational behaviour approach. While this has made a valuable contribution in highlighting a new area for study, this chapter highlights that power relations and interests need to be brought more to the fore when examining why employees may not speak out. In doing so, silence is reconceptualized as part of the ongoing exchange between management and workers which either party may pursue in terms of advancing their interests. The chapter finally outlines potential areas where such an approach to silence may provide interesting avenues of research.

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Edited by Adrian Wilkinson, Jimmy Donaghey, Tony Dundon and Richard B. Freeman

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Edited by Adrian Wilkinson, Jimmy Donaghey, Tony Dundon and Richard B. Freeman

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Adrian Wilkinson, Tony Dundon, Jimmy Donaghey and Richard B. Freeman

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Edited by Adrian Wilkinson, Jimmy Donaghey, Tony Dundon and Richard B. Freeman

The term ‘employee voice’ refers to the ways and means through which employees can attempt to have a say and influence organizational issues that affect their work and the interests of managers and owners. The concept is distinct, but related to and often overlapping with issues such as participation, involvement and, more recently, engagement. This Handbook provides an up-to-date survey of the current research into employee voice, sets this research into context and sets a marker for future research in the area.
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Edited by Adrian Wilkinson, Jimmy Donaghey, Tony Dundon and Richard B. Freeman

This thoroughly revised second edition presents up-to-date analysis from various academic streams and disciplines that illuminate our understanding of employee voice from a range of different perspectives. Exploring the previously under-represented paradigm of the organizational behaviour approach, new chapters take account of a broader conceptualization of employee voice. Written by expert contributors, this Handbook explores the meaning and impact of employee voice for various stakeholders and considers the ways in which these actors engage with voice processes such as collective bargaining, individual processes, mutual gains, task-based voice and grievance procedures