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Jing Zhang and Xufei Zhang

Since it adopted an open-door policy and launched economic reforms in 1978, China has experienced spectacular growth in its GDP and exports. China has become the world’s largest exporter since 2009 and its exports have grown much faster than imports, resulting in a huge trade surplus over the years. Meanwhile, China has also been one of the largest recipients of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the world. Its experience with exports and FDI undoubtedly has important implications for other developing countries. Rapid growth in China’s exports appears to have been due to its increasing involvement in processing trade, which is facilitated by FDI. Trade intermediaries and indirect export through Hong Kong also seem to have played an important role in this process. Intermediary firms play an important role in international trade, especially in Asian developing countries, and recent research in international trade has begun to examine the role of intermediary firms in export expansion. The chapter provides an updated picture of China’s exports and FDI by surveying the most recent research on this topic. It also identifies the challenges China faces, and explores the policy implications.

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Jianwei Zhang and Yijia Jing

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Andrei Levchenko and Jing Zhang

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Kei-Mu Yi, Michael Sposi and Jing Zhang

This informative research review discusses the most prominent papers within the economics of structural change and growth. This piece focuses on research that investigates the causes and consequences of structural change with either theoretical or calibrated models, mindfully referring to some of the most celebrated literature over the last two decades. The research review analyses literature covering the impact structural change has on an array of economic factors including convergence, per capita income and spatial development. Prefaced by an original introduction from the editors, this collection would be well suited to scholars and macro-development economists wishing to extend their knowledge of this compelling topic.
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Kei-Mu Yi, Michael Sposi and Jing Zhang

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Kei-Mu Yi, Michael Sposi and Jing Zhang