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John Groenewegen

Geoff Hodgson’s long-standing critique of the methodological individualism characteristic of both the mainstream and the new institutional economics revolves around the view that the economy is an open, evolving system in which actors and structures are mutually constituted. This position was instrumental in the formation of the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy in 1988. It also runs through Hodgson’s defence of the habit-based conception of agency characteristic of the original institutional economics and his proposals of various non-efficiency explanations of the firm. The chapter shows that the boundaries between the original and the new institutional economics have more recently become blurred, to the point that it is no longer useful to differentiate between the two. Institutional economics can be usefully seen as belonging to a continuum along which different schools of thought are more complements than substitutes. This opens the door for multiple opportunities for mutual learning.

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John Groenewegen and Piet de Vries

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Rolf W. Künneke and John Groenewegen

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Edited by Rolf W. Kunneke, John Groenewegen and Jean-François Auger

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The Governance of Network Industries

Institutions, Technology and Policy in Reregulated Infrastructures

Edited by Rolf W. Kunneke, John Groenewegen and Jean-François Auger

Infrastructures are subject to substantial readjustments of governance structures, often labeled as liberalization, privatization or re-regulation. This affects all traditional infrastructure sectors including communications, energy, transport and water. This study highlights and illustrates some of the major challenges for readjusting the governance of network industries from an economic, institutional, political and technological perspective. The three parts of the book address the institutional design of infrastructures, the role of technology in different sectors and actor behaviour.
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Aad Correlje, John Groenewegen and Jan Jaap Bouma