You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items

  • Author or Editor: John Halligan x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

John Halligan

This content is available to you

Edited by John Halligan

You do not have access to this content

Edited by John Halligan

Civil Service Systems in Anglo-American Countries presents a comprehensive overview of the important issues in modern bureaucracies, combined with a comparative analysis of the civil service systems and administrative traditions of five Anglo-American nations: Australia, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand and the United States.
You do not have access to this content

John Halligan

This content is available to you

John Halligan

This content is available to you

John Halligan

The starting point is a conundrum: why in the fourth decade of reform to public management and governance are major transformations being sought in Anglophone countries that raise questions similar to the issues engaging reformers in the 1980s? Major reform has occurred, yet official reports suggest little has changed in significant respects to public management systems showing signs of ossification and gridlock. There are also consistent indications that governance systems are out of kilter because of the lack of fit and balance between the parts, relationships and capacities. This chapter frames the book’s approach in terms of two dominant reform agendas, managerialism and politicisation, which have different implications for the role and functioning of public management and governance and are in conflict in important respects. The approach compares jurisdictions, exposing issues as a basis for exploring contradictions, performance shortfalls and unintended consequences such as bureaucratisation.

You do not have access to this content

John Halligan

Administrative traditions reflect values and principles influential in shaping structures, behaviours and cultures. The distinctive quality of the Anglophone tradition is that it both facilitates and constrains change. This has played an important role in modernisation. Questions arising about how the tradition affects reform, and the impact of reform on the tradition, are examined here and in other chapters. How are the principles and conventions a vehicle for continuity and change; in what ways do they facilitate and/or constrain; and does the ability to facilitate change override the constraints? Other questions concern the continuing distinctiveness and durability of the tradition given the level of managerial and political change, and whether countries share sufficient characteristics to be grouped. Finally, is the tradition best regarded as a flexible framework that can be adjusted to suit leaders’ needs or a set of principles against which to evaluate the system?