You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items

  • Author or Editor: John O. Haley x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

John O. Haley

This content is available to you

John O. Haley

This content is available to you

John O. Haley

You do not have access to this content

John O. Haley

You do not have access to this content

John O. Haley

The prevailing patterns of civil dispute resolution in Japan have been a major topic of study for over a half century. All agree that Japan enjoys distinctively lower rates of litigation per capita than any industrial country even its two closest (in terms of both geography and legal institutions) neighbours - South Korea and Taiwan. Various explanations for this phenomenon are offered. They include culturally preferred out-of-court settlement, institutional incapacity, the predictability of judicial outcomes, and the effective management of lawsuits. Subsequent studies and recent data tend to confirm all four of these explanations. The patterns of dispute resolution in Japan can thus be understood as a combination of factors - cultural, structural, managerial and above all rational.