You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items

  • Author or Editor: John S. Wilson x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Jean-Christophe Maur and John S. Wilson

The need for countries to facilitate trade and to reduce the transactions costs plaguing trade is receiving a lot of interest in policy circles, and in particular in the WTO, where trade facilitation has been one of the few good stories in recent multilateral negotiations. Is this interest justified? What have economic theory and empirical findings to contribute to our understanding of the value of free trade? This authoritative research review compiled by two leading scholars in the field, offers a collection of seminal articles that have led our economic thinking on these issues and encouraged a new and growing literature.
This content is available to you

Jean-Christophe Maur and John S. Wilson

You do not have access to this content

Jean-Christophe Maur and John S. Wilson

You do not have access to this content

Jean-Christophe Maur and John S. Wilson

You do not have access to this content

Hong Liu, Phil Molyneux and John O.S. Wilson

You do not have access to this content

Andreas G.F. Hoepner and John O.S. Wilson

You do not have access to this content

Esteban Ferro, John S. Wilson and Peter McConaghy

Trade facilitation is associated with the reduction of at-the-border transaction costs other than tariffs, and involves the simplification and standardization of customs formalities and administrative procedures related to international trade. In the past few years there has been renewed interest in trade costs and trade facilitation for two main reasons. The first is that today’s international trade landscape is increasingly characterized by global value chains that span national boundaries. The rise of global value chains and trade in intermediate inputs is connected to the decreases in traditional tariff barriers across all countries. Now the focus has moved to reducing costs of trade elsewhere. The second reason is the realization that trade liberalization has not had the expected positive impact on developing countries’ exports, leading analysts to emphasize the need to reduce trade costs, by enabling and financing trade facilitation reforms. These efforts have coalesced around global aid-for-trade initiatives which are part of the Doha Development Round of the World Trade Organization (WTO). This chapter presents an overview of key concepts, analytical and conceptual frameworks explaining trade facilitation and aid-for-trade efforts. It also provides a survey of the empirical literature, with particular attention on the proposed gains from implementing trade facilitation reform in areas of: customs procedures and border protection, transport and transit costs, information and communications technology, and the role of product standards and technical regulations on trade flows. The chapter concludes with a discussion of policy priorities for developing countries moving forward.