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Jeb Bleckley and Joshua Hall

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Emily Chamlee-Wright and Joshua C. Hall

Many young economists become bogged down in the first few years of teaching because they have had neither the time nor the experience nor the mentoring to think through and develop how best to structure their syllabus. By 'syllabus structure'the authors do not mean which readings are assigned, when they are assigned or what textbook will be used. Instead, they are concerned about how exactly a faculty member's expectations of the students are expressed to the students through the class syllabus. Young faculty members can encounter difficulties because of differences between their expectations and those of the students. The most obvious case of this is with respect to grading, but teaching is filled with other examples such as office hours, participation and so forth. In the chapter, the authors provide and discuss syllabus language that touches on three different areas of expectation management: managing out-of-class time, leading effective classroom discussion and setting and maintaining grading expectations.

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Joshua C. Hall, Robert A. Lawson and Saurav Roychoudhury

In this chapter we argue that the ability of people to freely trade, enter into contracts, and start businesses in a system of private property, and the rule of law are crucial for productive entrepreneurship. One measure of how freely individuals can engage in economic activity is the Economic Freedom of the World (EFW) index. After examining the economic policies that harm economic freedom and possibly entrepreneurship, we highlight the correspondence between economic freedom and a number of measures of entrepreneurship. We conclude with some thoughts regarding future research involving economic freedom and entrepreneurship. Keywords: Institutions, entrepreneurship, economic freedom

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Joshua C. Hall, Dean Stansel and Danko Tarabar

We synthesize and elaborate on the existing research concerning the role of the Economic Freedom of North America (EFNA) index. Our consensus after reading this literature is that the EFNA index is largely positively related with normatively good outcomes, and negatively related to normatively bad ones, with a few exceptions. The literature considers the EFNA index as a good proxy for institutional quality, regulatory environment, and business-related policies across North American states and provinces. In addition, a significant number of studies take interest in the EFNA as a variable to be explained by factors such as ideology, legal origins, and pro-market think tank spending. The literature on EFNA is still in its relative nascence, but is growing rapidly, and can provide a useful guide towards future policy changes leading into positive institutional transformations and hence better economic outcomes.

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Edited by Richard J. Cebula, Joshua Hall, Franklin G. Mixon Jr and James E. Payne

Expert editors add to an important field of research, the economics of entrepreneurship, and explore how institutions influence entrepreneurial behavior. This book provides comprehensive and contemporary insights into the interaction between economic behavior of firms and households, economic freedom, and entrepreneurship, and how it generates an environment with greater opportunities for growth and development for individuals, households, and private-sector firms.
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Edited by Richard J. Cebula, Joshua Hall, Franklin G. Mixon Jr and James E. Payne