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Edited by Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Anik Bhaduri and Joyeeta Gupta

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Edited by Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Anik Bhaduri and Joyeeta Gupta

Water security has received increasing attention in the scientific and policy community in recent years. This Handbook covers the wide range of perspectives required to understand water security as a concept guiding water governance and management at different levels and in different regions. It reflects on past, present and future challenges to water security and strategies on how to overcome them. An invaluable resource for scientific scholars, it will also appeal policymakers and practitioners interested in a deeper understanding of this important concept.
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Edited by Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Anik Bhaduri and Joyeeta Gupta

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Edited by Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Anik Bhaduri and Joyeeta Gupta

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Edited by Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Anik Bhaduri and Joyeeta Gupta

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Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Joyeeta Gupta and Anik Bhaduri

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Joyeeta Gupta, Joseph W. Dellapenna and Marcel van den Heuvel

This chapter argues that water security has many meanings. It addresses the question: will framing water in terms of ‘water security’ be likely to do a disservice to the water governance challenge of the 21st century? Isn’t there a real risk that the term will become hostage to a much more sinister use of ‘water security’ and lead to precisely the opposite effect? It argues that in the context of limited freshwater resources, its link not only to survival (existential aspects) but to economic growth runs the risk that more innocent uses of security at global and local levels play into the hands of the securitization process in which states control how water is divided between actors. Borrowing a discourse which was initially used for primarily existential reasons at state level may thus be risky. So while the use of security aims at enhancing the priority given to a subject by making it a high politics issue, this runs the risk of also encouraging the use of hard power to deal with it.
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Kirstin I. Conti, Neno Kukurić and Joyeeta Gupta

Humans abstract two hundred times more groundwater than oil, annually. Ironically, the role of groundwater in water management and supply is underappreciated, partially due to its invisibility. By conducting a literature survey and investigating groundwater information databases, this chapter answers the question: what are the physical and human dimensions of groundwater security at each geographic level and do they present a security issue at any or all of these levels? The chapter does not discuss the appropriateness of the security concept for groundwater challenges; rather it examines the physical and human dimension of groundwater security. It concludes that groundwater can present security challenges because of hydrogeological complexities; issues of distribution, quality, and overexploitation; and environmental dynamics linked with global change. These challenges amount to a security issue, the severity of which increases as geographic scope decreases; global challenges are emerging, while national and subnational challenges are severe in several cases.
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Nicolien van der Grijp, Emmy Bergsma and Joyeeta Gupta

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Frank Jaspers and Joyeeta Gupta